The Old Machinery Magazine Forum

Forum Categories => General Discussion => Topic started by: rustyengines on 13 May, 2016, 04:51:29 pm

Title: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 May, 2016, 04:51:29 pm
This tool is said to be a plumbers tool ?
How is each part of it used
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 May, 2016, 04:52:00 pm
Name on tool
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 13 May, 2016, 06:19:00 pm
Hello Ian
How can that be a plumbers tool? It doesn't look like a hammer at all.
Just kidding to all those plumbs out there.  ::)
They look kind of like multigrips don't they.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: David Syme on 13 May, 2016, 09:57:17 pm
Hello Ian,
We have these pliers, they are branded M and Wolseley and came with a shearing plant of that name, second hand 1940.
The large grip would be for the ferrules on the handpiece and down tube, the smaller one the drive spindle on the handpiece, I reckon you would be better with a proper screwdriver than the one on the handle.
Plus a wire cutter and a pointy thing on the other handle.
David.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 14 May, 2016, 11:45:14 am
From a 1938 catalogue:

(http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/cc10/Antique_Engines/Ahrems%201.jpg) (http://s213.photobucket.com/user/Antique_Engines/media/Ahrems%201.jpg.html)

(http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/cc10/Antique_Engines/Ahrems%202.jpg) (http://s213.photobucket.com/user/Antique_Engines/media/Ahrems%202.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 14 May, 2016, 01:17:05 pm
Thanks Eric
"Gas Pliers" that is most likely where the plumbers tool idea came from from a friend
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 16 May, 2016, 12:02:07 pm
Hello Ian,
Any chance of some more odd bod tools?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 16 May, 2016, 04:58:13 pm
I remember my Dad had a pair of these a long time ago and although he was not a plumber by trade did a lot of plumbing work on weekends, not just down pipes and guttering but the old galvanised pipes for water and then once copper came along and the capillary joiners that was the way he went then. So I thought plumbers pliers. Now I have all his tool boxes and tools they no longer exist but I did manage to find some really nice tin snips both straight and curved along with his favourite 'hacking' knife for cutting into sheet metal for when you wanted to cut a hole by hand using snips, eg a hole for the spigot to be fitted for a down pipe.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 May, 2016, 06:51:38 pm
Scott want's more old tools
A lot of them are brand names you that don't find anymore
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: oldgoat on 17 May, 2016, 10:07:09 pm
I have one of those valve spring compressor for side valve engines but a lot smaller than that one. Just the thing when trying to fit thosestupid Briggs and Stratton collets with the 2 different size holes in them.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 May, 2016, 05:15:42 pm
More brand name tools
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 May, 2016, 06:15:50 pm
One for Scott
Tell us more about it, what age etc
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 20 May, 2016, 09:50:27 pm
Hello Ian.
That is what is commonly known as an AVO 8. One of the best multimeters ever made. They were so accurate and, unlike the digital multimeters, they did not show 'ghost' readings, especially in AC volts.
The Mark 5 (which yours looks like Ian) was made in the early 70's or so. They started making them many years before though. Mid 30's if I remember rightly. It wasn't that long ago they stopped making them as well. Around 10 years or so?
I have a couple of versions of AVO meters. One of the early wood and ebonite (sp?) AVO's is in a special wooden display case in our Brisbane house as a feature and I still use one here when I need a good voltage reading. The analogue scale is one of the features I look for sometimes. But I have to say, digital multimeters have come leaps and bounds in the last 15 years. Probably one of the reasons AVO meters have become dinosaurs.
Ah, the memories. I still remember sitting in the meter test room in Grafton with one of those suckers sitting on the bench in front of me. ::)

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: John 54 on 21 May, 2016, 08:42:59 am
Hi All
My father-in-law passed away last year, while clearing out his shed I found this ( see picture below). It is an Eiliott Speed Indicator (Mechanical Tachometer ) It has three input shafts on the side each for a different rev range. The bottom is for the range100rpm to 500rpm the middle is for 400rpm to 2000rpm and the top is for 800rpm to 4000 rpm. It does not matter wether the motor or shaft is left hand or right hand rotation the dial reads correctly.
My father-in law was a refrigeration engineer he used it to check the speed of compressors and fans.
It is a magnificent piece of engineering.
Regards John     
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 21 May, 2016, 03:01:30 pm
More brand nam tools
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 21 May, 2016, 03:05:34 pm
Hi Scott I'm not unpacking anymore
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 May, 2016, 07:17:14 am
Hi Scott I'm not unpacking anymore
Ian
Hello Ian,
Oh come on.   ;)
The yellow thing is a wire strainer. At least I know that one.
It must time for other people to take the time to post some tools, so I'll get some old tools out later and post to see if people can identify them if I don't know what they are. There is one tool sitting in front of me that I've been trying to find out what it is for a few years now. I have an idea and I'll post them later.
There's a few spanners I've collected purely because of their brand name. I hope they're here and not in Brisbane.

Thanks for the pictures Ian. I really enjoy old tools no matter how small or big.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 May, 2016, 12:11:38 pm
These are sought of a tool
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 May, 2016, 12:13:17 pm
One more
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 May, 2016, 12:14:44 pm
Look at the brand name
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 May, 2016, 04:08:51 pm
One more for Scott, have you seen one of these
Yes a blower but for what use
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 May, 2016, 05:31:13 pm
Hello Ian,
You've got me on the blower matey. I would have guessed forge but it would get too hot.

Here is a tool I'd love to know what it's for. I found it years ago and all I can think of is a hole maker for leather belting like used in harness gear. Please if you know what it is let me know. The apple corer looking screw in the middle goes all the way through the base plate.

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-tgy2dFxkpKs/V0Fd999dP8I/AAAAAAAARJ8/bRy0w9ekOHM7ZZcSNbwqdQUMPouXW93iQCCo/s912/SAM_0261.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-0K3sOeBjr68/V0Fd7PKITwI/AAAAAAAARJ8/FJArzYrkrG0QzsmLJ0aYRXc-NBi2ijyFACCo/s912/SAM_0259.JPG?gl=AU)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 May, 2016, 05:34:39 pm
Hello all
Here are a couple of my Pop's tools. Who knows what they're used for?
I'm going to take them to some rallies one day to show people. I doubt if too many have seen them in action.

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AgnKzeEX-Aw/V0FeFKEnH6I/AAAAAAAARKE/Fl787b5G-OwzxvnLj9ujP8GmqTI9JgcHgCCo/s640/SAM_0264.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-xBzoKaTwgpw/V0FeBNcsMtI/AAAAAAAARJ8/mfOo3Nwp27UMXRIzfTxxsUqMWi7tjMxKgCCo/s912/SAM_0262.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-vxLWi6q6v30/V0FeLntS9II/AAAAAAAARKE/HNKmK8r64fgIRFzWGGnDe0Z05wTaAZbGgCCo/s640/SAM_0265.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NnrypTG7DTA/V0FeQCX-w_I/AAAAAAAARKM/cUBpBwAZpGsSYr52ZOEmkt3bBT6M4HYnwCCo/s912/SAM_0266.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-c1WbEp3kyCE/V0FeT4B1u3I/AAAAAAAARKM/my6Crn1Yx4wFo9TWiQbbyjtiHIpZ4sS7QCCo/s912/SAM_0270.JPG?gl=AU)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 May, 2016, 05:36:31 pm
Can anyone guess what Pop's first trade was?

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JBj8YT7J7AQ/V0FeYOuboLI/AAAAAAAARKM/oOW1MBPVknAV1zy6rQ2LEZ55eArveQ2mACCo/s640/SAM_0271.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nU4uQZ0Tq0U/V0Fec2cJ9CI/AAAAAAAARKU/ibHPzyoPPg8gZ8PzBdb22KKR0msURHlXQCCo/s640/SAM_0272.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-lSo5reXlBUg/V0FejPcvkkI/AAAAAAAARJ4/U7e9TaBfpnAOmynrs1GIx36erHg7qXGtwCCo/s640/SAM_0275.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-i4_1ZjxmhDc/V0FerNjca4I/AAAAAAAARKc/SpoSWm-K4pk-UACqavG2QsbdcxFzzuMhACCo/s800/SAM_0277.JPG?gl=AU)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: famous fitter on 22 May, 2016, 07:00:37 pm
Oh Scotty thats too easy!!!!
You only have to go to my Grandfathers shed to see them still in use!!!!,I won't ruin the fun and see what the others come up with.
We are making some  items with them at the moment, when the time comes I'll post pictures of the almost lost trade they are used for.
I watch and listen very carefully when i'm with the Generation of people that used these tools,its always worth the time to pick up the little secrets and what the correct type of material is used for which part of the job!!!!

Cheers Justin
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 May, 2016, 09:43:14 pm
The first one ???
Scott think about wooden spokes
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: winnock on 22 May, 2016, 10:05:10 pm
The name on this spanner explains it all. I wonder how many are around? It is very crudely made so probably quite old.
Hugh
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: winnock on 22 May, 2016, 10:17:48 pm
This tube spanner was patented by Reginald Duigan, brother of John Duigan the well known Australian aviator. Reginald lived near Colac and the patent is dated 1931. The handle is formed in such a way that it cannot be removed from the spanner.
Hugh
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 22 May, 2016, 10:58:31 pm
Scott, tools appear to be  a spoke pointer and hollow auger as for what trade anything from a pattern maker too a wheel wright , ship wright ... etc .
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 23 May, 2016, 11:12:33 am
Hello Ian,
You've got me on the blower matey. I would have guessed forge but it would get too hot.

Here is a tool I'd love to know what it's for. I found it years ago and all I can think of is a hole maker for leather belting like used in harness gear. Please if you know what it is let me know. The apple corer looking screw in the middle goes all the way through the base plate.

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-tgy2dFxkpKs/V0Fd999dP8I/AAAAAAAARJ8/bRy0w9ekOHM7ZZcSNbwqdQUMPouXW93iQCCo/s912/SAM_0261.JPG?gl=AU)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-0K3sOeBjr68/V0Fd7PKITwI/AAAAAAAARJ8/FJArzYrkrG0QzsmLJ0aYRXc-NBi2ijyFACCo/s912/SAM_0259.JPG?gl=AU)

This tool is for drilling holes in vee belts, specifically on early belt drive motorcycles. Originally, every rider that had a belt drive bike would have had one in his tool kit.

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 May, 2016, 02:25:27 pm
2 part bras screwdriver, the end screws out for a smaller screwdriver yes I have seen ones that are similar but not one the same as this
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 23 May, 2016, 05:02:05 pm
I've never seen a double screw driver for a bra before!  ::)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 May, 2016, 06:08:05 pm
Hi John my computer has gone walkabout and trying to get used to a small tabet where I can't see what I'm typing 'bras' or for a edit button if only for 10 miniuts
BRASS
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 24 May, 2016, 08:42:44 am
This tool is for drilling holes in vee belts, specifically on early belt drive motorcycles. Originally, every rider that had a belt drive bike would have had one in his tool kit.
Hello all
What a champ is that tractor fan  :D
I was fairly close thinking a hole maker in leather belts but there is no way I would have imagined v-belts.
Would it be possible to scan the rest of that page Mr Fan of tractors? Why would you need to bung holes in perfectly good fanbelts?

Kim has the spoke arris/taper maker/spoke pointer gizmo right. Pop's first trade was wheelwright
What about the second dodad with the scale on the side? Any ideas?

I would love to see someone with any skill use these items. I am very envious of you Justin. I have played around with them but I cannot make them 'sing their song' properly.
I too listen to the old farts. They've been doing things for so long now they know the 'tricks of the trade' and my train of thought is...if they know, I want to know.

Cheers Scott
PS: my pop used to have 3 of those small brass screwdrivers fitting into each other. He used them on ignitions. He had them in a roll of tools especially for ignitions. He had different sets of magneto spanners, small spanners, points files, screwdrivers, small oiler and greaser and a few other tools in his roll. I don't know where the roll is now  :(
At least I have a set of his magneto spanners  :)

 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 11:24:48 am
This was saved from a shed fire a few years back, a steam recording tool?
The amaizing part there was no damage inside even to the recording paper
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 11:26:38 am
More pictures
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 24 May, 2016, 03:41:50 pm
Quote
Would it be possible to scan the rest of that page Mr Fan of tractors? Why would you need to bung holes in perfectly good fanbelts?
Happy to help Scott, I've got a collection odd tools and I like identifying them where I can.

These weren't  so much used for fan belts, more drive belts on veteran motorcycles. The reason they used these punches was that they used very long vee belts, it was easier to use a section of belt and use a link joiner. If you get to see a restored veteran bike today, it’ll most likely have a joiner similar to this one, or they’ll use a belt made up of small links, something like a Whittle or Brammer belt.

I can't remember where I got that scan from; I did it a while ago. You could use the tool on any vee belt, really, but these tools were originally marketed towards motorcyclists.


Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 24 May, 2016, 05:03:20 pm
Hello Ian,
Any chance of some more odd bod tools?

Cheers Scott

Scott,
Here are a few more tools which used to be quite common - not so much now though. On #4 the red clamp is only there to allow the end of the tool to be seen.
The 2000 on #3, the eclipse tool, is not a date: it is at least 40 years old. The V block on #5 is clamped onto the bar and can be moved along the bar. If you miss any of them I will give the answer later.

A bit more history to add to tractorfan's identification of the V belt punch. I used to have an old book published in 1920 in which the author gave some of his experiences with motor bikes from the middle 1890s on. Unfortunately the book disappeared during one of our house moves, but I remember his description of the "boot lace belts" that were used prior to the introduction of Vee belts. These were just a long thin strip of leather twisted into a tight spiral, with the two ends joined with a"little meat hook".

In dry weather on dusty roads they would glaze and slip, in wet conditions they would stretch and slip. This was a nuisance, but was easily fixed by cutting a bit off one end of the belt and rejoining the ends. When the belts got old and brittle it paid to carry a generous supply of spare hooks. If you cut too much off, you would just unwind a few turns of the spiral, and hey presto, your belt would become longer.

It sounds, from the need to carry a Vee belt punch, as though the early Vee belts may have suffered from some of the same problems as the earlier leather belts.

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 24 May, 2016, 05:03:49 pm
Is the little blower for supercharging the Fiat 500?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 24 May, 2016, 05:06:33 pm
Is #1 - bearing scrapers? #4 main jet in a carby tool?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 24 May, 2016, 05:31:43 pm
Hello all
I cannot thank you chaps enough. I'm so happy you people have told me about the belt joiner/puncher/hole maker dodad.

1-bearing scrapers. Mine were flogged when our house was broken into years ago. Bugger. I miss them
2-gauge of some description? No idea in reality
3-nibblers for light metals or gasket paper?
4-G clamp and jet tool. Would the jet tool be for primus kero burning type gear?
5-no idea  ??? But it looks as though I can make one for what-ever reason it was made.
6-brazing tool for arch welder. carbon rods are inserted intot he clampy things with wingnuts and the rods rotate to strike the arc.
No number-rule come marking gauge, screwdriver, pry-bar, piece of packing, back scratcher, scraper, paint tin opener, drum sticks, cuppa stirrer, sambo cutter, peanut butter applicator, sword, and by nowhere last....flyswatter. Metric/imperial complete with hanging hole. I found the rounded end doesn't wear a hole in my back pocket as quick as a square edged ruler.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: John 54 on 24 May, 2016, 05:43:31 pm
Hi cobbadog and Frank
#4 is for removing the jets out of a blowtorch and removing the check valve at the bottom of the pump of said blow torches also starting lamps and stoves, a different spanner is required to remove the jets out of starting lamp and stove burners see spanners below.
#1 as you say are a pair of bearing scrapers
#2 is for finding the center of a round piece of material.
#3 look like nibblers for sheet metal.
#5 you have got me??????
#6 is a carbon ark welding hand piece, missing the two pieces of carbon.
Regards John
PS Hi Scott you pasted as I finished my reply   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 24 May, 2016, 06:47:42 pm
Good going! between all the responders you have correctly identified all but #5. Clue: I am still waiting for Rusty Engines to identify #5.

The others were:
1.  Bearing scrapers
2.  Centre finder for round bars
3. Hand nibbler. The 3 blades are for thin sheet metal, laminates, and cutting arcs in either material.
4.  Tool for removing the burner nipples and pump valves from Primus kerosene blow lamps and stoves.

6.  Lincoln carbon arc torch. Attaches to a welder for heating and brazing.

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 07:33:10 pm
What some people will do to tools just for most likely one job
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 07:35:18 pm
"I am still waiting for Rusty Engines to identify #5." why me  ;D
He is one the same as your Scott that I have
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 07:38:01 pm
This one has been up once before somewhere back in an old post
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 May, 2016, 07:42:15 pm
This is for apprentices so they can drill a hole of center
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 25 May, 2016, 12:42:48 am
Hi Ian,

QUOTE: "I am still waiting for Rusty Engines to identify #5." why me  ;D"

Mower collector!

The fifth tool in my photo which nobody picked is a sharpener for reel mower blades. The Vee block guide is placed over one blade and its position adjusted so the short file clamped to the base of the tool to the left of the Vee block lies over the adjacent blade.

To be fair, it is the only one I have ever seen. My wife picked it up about 45 years ago at the closing down sale of a very long established general store in Ingham not knowing what it was. It could well have been there since well before WW2 for all I know.

At the same sale she also got a sickle (rarely used), and a pitch fork, very useful occasionally for picking up piles of loose vegetation, e.g. the debris left after a cyclone. Her fourth unusual ( I thought at the time) purchase at the sale was an English scythe handle without a blade, a bit like buying a hammer handle without the head! Even then scythes had gone out of fashion, and the only new scythe blade I could find anywhere was for an Italian scythe, which has a straight handle, so the very expensive double curved English handle didn't fit because the blade was at the wrong angle to the ground. However, after making an adapter it worked OK, and it is still a lot quicker than a whipper snipper for knocking down long wet season weeds, though harder on the back than I remember 45 years ago.

Frank.

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 25 May, 2016, 08:36:39 am
He is one the same as your Scott that I have
Ian
Hello Ian
Yours must be the 'luxury' version as it has a few things ours doesn't. The gear drive for the 'opener' been one, the scale on the side, the set screw on the blade and last, but by no-where least, paint. Red and black paint.

Franco, you may not believe this but many years ago I brought some scythe blades wrapped up in grease paper. I think there was about 4 of them. I know where one is and I'll have to think where I put the others. There's also a wooden handled scythe, an alloy handled scythe and an iddy biddy one that looks a lot like a golf club from hell. We use the iddy biddy one for cutting a bit of fresh lucerne for the ponies and for looking after snakes.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 25 May, 2016, 03:59:43 pm
Hello all,
We have a junk auction every Wednesday here in Warwick. I usually go to see what crap is up for sale and I'm normally home for smoko after seeing the crap. And most of the stuff is just that....utter CRAP!!!
Anyways I spotted a couple of useful boxes of crap that could gather dust in our shed. So after eating a sausage sambo for smoko, I liberated $28 from my wallet and became the proud owner of someone else's rubbish.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-knFpf2cDCS0/V0UkbP_iS4I/AAAAAAAARNY/cdADiO4oA24UBWVDQj3ifpX6b5Pu9zyUgCCo/s720/SAM_0286.JPG)

Here is something I've been going to make to finish a job off. A box of tapered pins. That saves a job.   :D
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-vySWunNI25M/V0UkrGLJalI/AAAAAAAARNY/EG2u6Gl6d7Ui1c8k2sANrDc1fcUheRuxACCo/s720/SAM_0297.JPG)

And there were a few spanners from makers such as good old Sidchrome, Lister, Ford (Canada), Triumph, Pope, BSA and a few from the US. A variety of teeny weeny tube spanners was also found. I'm so happy about the tube spanners. I've been looking to buy some small ones.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-52ul8ag9E7E/V0Ukj3V9zkI/AAAAAAAARNY/CsIYR4pFAmIoYrfsQj4iqcOohH0NC1vkQCCo/s640/SAM_0292.JPG)

And there was a spanner with a sort of scale on both sides. Anyone know anything about it?

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/--WhUE2-KjDY/V0Uklro6m7I/AAAAAAAARNY/PVlv58L0gBw9dXf9QH9POWQyRjGwHr4VACCo/s640/SAM_0293.JPG)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-N9pzAs5hY_Q/V0Ukm9QfLaI/AAAAAAAARNY/fx10PxjIVdAS_t4SDpJqQb7oRRCryUHwwCCo/s640/SAM_0294.JPG)

There was also the mandatory coupla grease guns, an oil gun and a Wakefield drum pump. Very happy with the drum pump...and it works. Yep, tried it already.  8)

There were a couple of sets of pliers looking thingoes. Anyone know what they were used for?

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-VJUxsWygRCg/V0UkoIeW0PI/AAAAAAAARNY/1tytb1WEbKwi6geEckBfeenYd8cscxo3ACCo/s512/SAM_0295.JPG)

And there was even a couple boxes of bolts. Bolts are always handy.  ;)

Anyways, I think I got good value for the $28. I spent another $30 on a Husqvarna while I was there. It works well.

Cheers Scott

Oh....there was a fire lighter in amoungst the stuff as well. It's that long blue thing at the top of the 1st picture
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Oldengines on 25 May, 2016, 05:43:05 pm
spanner with scale is a fuel gauge for ferguson tractor, pliers are for brake shoe spring removing/replacing
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 25 May, 2016, 06:41:59 pm
Saw tooth setting tool, look at the date 1889 I know not when it was made but I wounder just how far forward of that date was it made
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 26 May, 2016, 06:52:15 am
spanner with scale is a fuel gauge for ferguson tractor, pliers are for brake shoe spring removing/replacing
Hello all
Thanks for that  :)
I did a bit of research on the EN18 Ferguson spanner and the scale on the other side is marked in cm. The cm is barely legible on the spanner in the picture. That an only lead to another question: Why imperial fluid measurements and metric lineal measurements? I'm going to have to go and check the scaling to see if it is centimetres when the frost lifts. Too cold at the moment.

On the brake pliers, there's a round thing on the bottom of one of the handles. What was this used for? This was the bit that had me stumped.
What about the pliers next to the brake pliers? Or are they simply pliers?
I'm sorry that I have so many questions, but that's me I suppose.  :-[

Ian, this may be of interest. Disston had the patent from 1899 but they made those suckers for a long time.
Here is a 1902 version and I found versions of them into the 30's.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Disston_Triumph_Saw-set.jpg)
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Disston_Triumph_Saw-set.jpg (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Disston_Triumph_Saw-set.jpg)

Saw sets an be very ornate. I have one that would not look out of place in the kitchen or flash office. One of the distinct memories of my dad is when he was home (worked away a lot as a builder for Dept. of Ag) he always touched up his handsaws and set them. It's not that easy to do I found out. The natural tendency is too concentrate too much on the teeth in the middle of the saw, hence saws with bellies.
As a side note: I have most of the parts for a cast saw holder in the shed for sharpening by hand and I know where an automatic handsaw sharpener is sitting. I'm waiting for a price on that so I can fix all the hand saws I've probably stuffed up by sharpening by hand, and I have to pick up a circular saw sharpener (gullener?) for large circular saws when I go to Brisbane next. It's going to be a job. It's heavy.

Cheers Scott
PS: I went looking for a couple of spanners I've been saving up to give to a some goose. I hope they're in Brisbane as they aren't here in Warwick. I had 3 or 4 and gave one away. The bloke laughed and laughed about it when I gave it to him (but he has a sense of humour)
PPS: We tried out our new/second hand $30 Husky last night. Works a treat and I'm in the good books  :D
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 26 May, 2016, 08:08:58 am

Hi Scott,

I have a pair of these brake spting pliers and on mine, the round bit on the end of the handle is open on the other side. It is used to hook the spring back onto a pin type anchor. You put the handle through the spring eye, place the spoon shape over the end of the pin, raise the pliers and the spring slides down and over the end of the pin.

Perhaps these are similar.
Cheers, Steve,
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 26 May, 2016, 10:40:38 am
brake spring pliers same as Scotts
Better pictures
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 26 May, 2016, 04:34:39 pm
Hi Scott,
The spanner with the numbers on it is a Grey Fergie spanner. It measures the fuel in the fuel tank using the numbers as well as setting the depth of the plough and the spanner suits many of the nuts  on the tractor and ploughs. Been looking for one for Dees HRH Sarah but want the European version which has inches one side and cm the other.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 30 May, 2016, 09:03:18 am
Weekend pick up will clean up later
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 30 May, 2016, 07:17:33 pm
A few have seen this so likely easy but any how take a guess ?

Kim
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 30 May, 2016, 07:40:16 pm
The vice grip type of pliers I posted above are
http://www.ebay.com/itm/DE-STA-CO-WELDING-AIRCRAFT-TOGGLE-CLAMP-PLIERS-LARGE-NICE-COND-MECHANIC-TOOL-/152092098128?hash=item2369653e50:g:ApkAAOSw7W5XOPxV
At long last I know what they were used for which does make seance as during WW2 Townsville had a large USA air force base here
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 31 May, 2016, 08:17:10 am
Hello all
Gee wizz that's a flash screwdriver there Ian. Screwdrivers, to me, are items that are either well designed or rubbish. We went from the big handled screwdrivers, such as what Ian has posted' to the tiny gripped screwdrivers from the 70-onwards and now, if you want to pay more, screwdrivers have gone back the big handles. I used to get cramps in my hands from using the Stanley type of screwdrivers when I worked. I splurged and brought myself a set of Irazolas and cramps after prolonged use disappeared the next day. I got them in 1996 and still have/use them today. And they're not worn out, so either I don't do much or they're good screwdrivers.

Well done on finding out what the other thingo is. I was going to guess valve remover for tiny engines or similar, but I would have been wrong. Really wrong  ;D

Kim....a guess if I may as I have no idea. A test kit to see if oil or diesel has water in it?

Shifting spanners. The range and designs these came in is mind blowing. I'll see if remember to get a couple of odd one we have out later.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 31 May, 2016, 03:58:45 pm
"We went from the big handled screwdrivers"
Yes Scott it is solid
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 31 May, 2016, 04:35:18 pm
"Shifting spanners. The range and designs these came in is mind blowing."
Yes Scott like this one so you can do twice the amount of work
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 June, 2016, 08:11:45 am
The smallest 'Kind Dick' made
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 June, 2016, 09:00:37 am
That's the brand of spanner I've been looking for for the last week!!! I have some somewhere...but where are they?  :-[
I know a few people I could give one to, but the 'gesture' may well 'go over their head'  ;D  ::)  :o

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 June, 2016, 02:34:09 pm
An ad for the shifting spanner
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Mr Craig on 01 June, 2016, 02:50:43 pm
What is the benefit of it being double ended. ?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 June, 2016, 04:34:58 pm
What is the benefit of it being double ended. ?
Better balance for when you do your 'nanna and chuck the $%@# thing?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 02 June, 2016, 12:19:05 am
On the right track Scott in the fuel test, but not moisture but a flash test, here's the instructions on the inner door.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 02 June, 2016, 04:19:54 pm
I've had this in my shed for many years and I only think I know what it is for and that is to test the house wiring in a house that has the wires running through metal conduit. The meter is a bit sad as it doesn't go back to zero but there is a slight tingle that comes through the wires when you crank it. There is a little red light that lights up if you crank it up a bit.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 02 June, 2016, 04:21:18 pm
a couple more pics
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 02 June, 2016, 05:41:06 pm
Hello John
That is an old hand cranked Megger and is indeed used for testing insulation around wires, in motors etc and is also used for testing to see if a wire is continuous or not (ie broken or bad connection in the middle). That one was usually used on 240V single phase type wiring, motors etc and when you do the insulation test about 500V is pumped into the circuit. A more powerful instrument was used on 415V wiring, motors etc.  About 1000V is used on 415V or 3 phase wiring etc
We were still using those mongrel things into the early 80's and when we got some press button ones we thought we were made.
The testing can only be done on dead circuits (no power) and that light is more then likely an indicator that lets you know if there is power in the circuit or not. Hopefully not.
Another apprentice I was working with hit the test button when the circuit had power in it once. Blew the begeesus out of the meter it did. It was so funny ;D
Megger is only a brand of meter but the industry uses Megger (for the instrument) or megged (as a process) as jargon.
The outer scale measures in million of ohms (megohms) and the inner scale is in ohms. For insulation you want to see infinity or close to it (the sideways 8 near 50 Mohm), if the reading is below 1 megohm then something is bad. Really, really bad. And for continuity you want as close to zero as possible. Anything over 3 ohm is really, really bad.

All of the above is very general information for those with no knowledge on meggers and their use. If you want to get more precise on the above info  then please do so.

Cheers Scott
PS: the press button ones were great at TAFE when you wired up the autosparky's chair and table and hit the button when he went to sleep. The tables had a really nice aluminium strip around the outside which made a great zappy point with arms and bellies.
In those days autosparky dudes and my type of sparky bonehead did the same first year at TAFE.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 03 June, 2016, 10:37:24 am
This ad is USA dated 1895 a Tree pruner and not much different to ones you buy today
I wounder when first made as the ad say 'improved'
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 03 June, 2016, 11:05:19 am
Here is one for you Scott
"Please explain"
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 June, 2016, 01:24:53 pm
Here is one for you Scott
"Please explain"
Ian
Hello Ian.
Temperature control? I don't know for certain but my guess would be temperature control/thermostat.
Someone may well know exactly why 4 pins.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 03 June, 2016, 04:23:05 pm
Just by looking at the plug and spotting the horizontal pin I thought POMMY but the 4th pin threw that out the window.

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 03 June, 2016, 04:38:50 pm
 What is this spanner used for. The material is bronze looking
The sizes what are they ??
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 June, 2016, 05:49:12 pm
Just by looking at the plug and spotting the horizontal pin I thought POMMY but the 4th pin threw that out the window.
Hello Cobba.
Some useless information for you.
As a general rule, when you see two pins in the configuration of a T it means polarised and DC. On this plug you can see there are 3 terminals facing the same direction and one that's perpendicular. If you look at the 'wonky' one and the terminal opposite (left and right terminals) you can visualise the T configuration. I think the two pins on the top and bottom is simply a temperature sensor.

I think Clipsal still make the polarised plugs and sockets etc and if my memory is OK the Clipsal number for the plug is 492/32, but please don't quote me on that. I haven't worked for near 20 years.

Cheers then
Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 June, 2016, 05:55:21 pm
What is this spanner used for. The material is bronze looking
The sizes what are they ??
Ian
Hello Ian.
What a nice spanner. Marine or non-magnetic use?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: John 54 on 03 June, 2016, 07:45:20 pm
Hi Scott
Brass tools are often used in the oil industry because they won't cause a spark.
Regards John
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 06 June, 2016, 02:58:39 pm
Weekend pick up some brand name spanners
Look at the first one a lot of offset no name or sizes so most likely came with some machinery as part of a tool kit 
Shelly, Matador, Superslim 
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 06 June, 2016, 04:38:14 pm
Hi Ian, years back Pa had a lot of sheet metal equipment he either made or bought to do his backyard weekend work with. One was a 3' foot operated guillotine and it came with a spanner the same shape, big offset, and was a Whitworth size around 7/8" to an 1". So as you suggest may have came from something along those lines.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 07 June, 2016, 09:28:36 am
This is the smallest shifter made by 'Fuller'
This a real shifter not of a key ring or a salesman sample (toy)
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 07 June, 2016, 06:12:06 pm
Hello all
I have yet to find something to use those teeny weeny shifters on Ian.

Remember the tube spanners I brought a couple of weeks ago? I try to be organised and I hate looking for, or losing, tools so I made a roll for the little tube spanners. So now, if I lose one I've lost the lot  ;D

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-qsm-3M-VtiA/V1Z-PvFUBII/AAAAAAAARPc/3iOqvvTd1mAgpTL5i_A3Zadp4vbQ6JvWACCo/s720/SAM_0285.JPG)

Here's a few shifters. The one on the bottom has an auto tightening feature. When you put weight on the handle (if you use it the right way) it pushes the knurled nut over further making the jaws tighter

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-HV-J7nkePB0/V1Z-RGUeNwI/AAAAAAAARPg/gRegrQcePcwpf_VWJC3avOsTNdaJeLyaQCCo/s720/SAM_0287.JPG)

Here's a couple of common dodads that I still use

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-U2zBzaZSGxA/V1Z-SecterI/AAAAAAAARPg/uYpBRxdid5QYIH__j924A6w9IjU41EWqQCCo/s720/SAM_0289.JPG)

I do not know what this is for specifically but I tell people my dear old mum used it to pull our baby teeth.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-TVPIWo5FvdM/V1Z-TRz5hPI/AAAAAAAARPg/JrtyOXbj_Q84u171uThWN7z9hYqB4G-dQCCo/s720/SAM_0290.JPG)

VW spanners on the top and a Honda spanner on the bottom. I have quite a few Honda and VW spanners and tools.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ERk8hRuG7uo/V1Z-Uh6J2aI/AAAAAAAARPg/Tpkcen5DjPcOYcNhAWNcRNDXVY2S-p8rQCCo/s720/SAM_0292.JPG)

This little bugger is so handy. I really don't understand the sizing but I use it all the time. The ratchet is so fine and the head fits into a lot of spots

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Rsq8ECvR0v4/V1Z-V2sRKNI/AAAAAAAARPg/toQMgUnif3UU9itJC8BBxL33YZGpUf1zACCo/s720/SAM_0293.JPG)

Self explanatory

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-QM-2uTRyGp0/V1Z-ZKQl-zI/AAAAAAAARPg/nMWQfnWVVFYtPv22mInK1j6KkWA88hgawCCo/s720/SAM_0295.JPG)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-hwJbitPy84k/V1Z-aBbDWBI/AAAAAAAARPg/QtzUcdoChAgsh3_OJtcY1bGGOkFDGlCcQCCo/s720/SAM_0296.JPG)

Implement spanners. Some of these can get very decorative. The MVK, John Deere, Sunshine and some others.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JlBYskH_ss0/V1Z-a5Sl8VI/AAAAAAAARPg/k6qJjEtxAKEX32xSFXQiXuTahqQ57EG1QCCo/s720/SAM_0297.JPG)

Cheers Scott

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 07 June, 2016, 10:01:31 pm
Would this be a type of shifter??
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 08 June, 2016, 06:13:39 pm
Hello all
I meant to comment on the silky oak Ian. It's one of my most admired timbers.  :)

Here's a tool that's more then likely for the country boys. If you know what they are and know how to use them please remind me never to upset you.  ;D
They're well made and made in QLD. Actually, I think the QLD State of Origin team uses them every year somehow  :o

Anyways...some pictures. Who knows what they are?
Cheers then
Scott

Overall picture
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kYI7mauhjh4/V1fORMisEUI/AAAAAAAARQ4/9ixzEn2nHosm8eAUG9AelOxU-i7_LKwQACCo/s720/SAM_0293.JPG)

Jaws closed
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ZBZK6Tq8mTo/V1fOOuvUVYI/AAAAAAAARQ4/_KAYne6XhPsEM-qdVpoG5EcAoWlrINMrACCo/s720/SAM_0288.JPG)

Jaws open
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-YJ02GucANu8/V1fOPRBD7LI/AAAAAAAARQ4/QavxYlLLPeA73mdleDitNuAM_Sdsw-TQQCCo/s720/SAM_0289.JPG)

The jaws wobble either way
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-XrorHcrsRfc/V1fOQKvS8uI/AAAAAAAARQ4/uaZ8_zSbScknVH4WYlfu8NubIgP77P5_QCCo/s720/SAM_0291.JPG)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-DKF4zLESHn4/V1fOQjd0kwI/AAAAAAAARQE/mtLaImhIZWsce294Q22Z3-OdEk2JedXGQCCo/s720/SAM_0292.JPG)

One side of the jaws are like scissors and the other side like fluted
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-6Mog4C7FyU8/V1fOSSw7zDI/AAAAAAAARQ4/6_ctm37rbKMa_UsZJXlvsPBg6Lw2SpgaQCCo/s720/SAM_0295.JPG)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-511ZL9WWNps/V1fOSyFdc7I/AAAAAAAARQ4/Ob3I4Pptfc0O-FWS9bpynBaK-yCyDDkqwCCo/s720/SAM_0296.JPG)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-v82I4U2bkqY/V1fOTdeGShI/AAAAAAAARQ4/6nK63GRB2hQoBjmeVJl8T9kuqbHaoYMYwCCo/s720/SAM_0297.JPG)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 08 June, 2016, 06:44:08 pm
Can't help but see the ruler above the tool  ;D I think if I saw that tool coming towards me I would do as the ruler says "000"
Ian   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 09 June, 2016, 02:16:00 pm
LOL

Is it something to keep young male lambs in their place?

I also noticed way back you listed some dodads, was one of them for knurling over the brass rivets on brake shoes? this was the one with a long threaded section that also has a pin protruding into the solid metal area?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Mr Craig on 09 June, 2016, 03:14:47 pm
i thought it was a link remover for a chain breaker
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 09 June, 2016, 05:33:01 pm
Hello all
Bingo Mr Craig.  :D
For the other thingo...think bigger Cobba.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 10 June, 2016, 04:44:47 pm
BULL !
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 June, 2016, 04:43:22 pm
Another small spanner strange shape flat on one side and cast iron
110mm long
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 11 June, 2016, 08:26:06 pm
Seen one of these before. Pretty sure it's a bed spanner.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2016, 09:27:18 am
"We went from the big handled screwdrivers"
Yes Scott it is solid
Ian
Hello Ian,
Were there any markings on the screwdriver? It look a bit like a Willys Jeep screwdriver.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 June, 2016, 11:32:24 am
No Scott no markings
Bed spanner! another area to search
One more picked up yesterday a quick clean no brand name
Just a 'B' and 108
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 June, 2016, 06:41:56 pm
Hacksaw blade holder dates back to the 1960s or earlier
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 19 June, 2016, 09:43:40 am
All plastic hand drill have not seen one like this before
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 June, 2016, 05:10:01 pm
Danielson USA
What would this be called ??? pliers
Used for what
Very short jaws and don't fully close
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 20 June, 2016, 07:47:00 pm
Reminds me of a pair of pliers I had when doing my apprenticeship in 1970. Were known as "battery pliers" As they could be used for undoing the bolts on the terminals, plus spread the spring loaded ones etc.
Pliers long gone now
Rx
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 June, 2016, 09:25:34 pm
Hi Allisb just ask Mr Google and yes
"Battery Pliers" 
Thanks
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 21 June, 2016, 05:47:55 am
Haha, I should have asked Uncle Google and I could have given a positive ID!
Nah, it's just the first thing I thought of.
Wish I still had the pliers, like a lot of things that are gone from my toolbox.

Cheers
Rx
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 21 June, 2016, 06:31:00 am
Wish I still had the pliers, like a lot of things that are gone from my toolbox.

Cheers
Rx
Hello all,
Rex, one of the worst moments of my life was hen I found that some scum of the earth stole my big tool box and emptied the shadow boards. The b@strd$ even stole one of those cheap red trolleys from superdupercheap  because it was all too heavy to carry or even lift.
Insurance tried to replace it but it's not the same and a lot of tools are just irreplaceable. At least they were good after I explained why I had the tools I had and could prove it. The insurance even sent a specialist tools person to assess the loss.
At least they left my Irazola screwdrivers on the wall. They took the Stanley's and left them. The Irazola's must not have been shiny enough. Incidentally, the Irazola's was one reason the insurance claim went through so smoothly. That and all the empty boxes I kept over the years.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 21 June, 2016, 03:12:51 pm
End Cutting Nippers ? small
Yes 'British Made' But by who
No other markings can be found
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 June, 2016, 04:41:49 pm
This is the smallest pipe vice I have seen made to fit on the edge of a bench or maybe because of its size on a work vehicle
Made buy 'Footprint' a UK firm that closed dawn a few years back
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 June, 2016, 05:17:51 pm
Grrrr edit button dawn **Down****
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 26 June, 2016, 05:16:10 pm
I have a number of these tool but this is the only one with a name on it
TANGYE BROTHERS yes the same people who made the Tangye engines did not know that they also made range of tools
This web site will help to fill many of the cold days for the people down south
http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Tangyes
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 July, 2016, 11:07:55 am
This took was used for ?
Arnold or one side Fairfax the other side is the wire bit original if so why
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 July, 2016, 11:12:11 am
This is a Tool
Picked up this today a bottle opener from Birmacley Table Margarine. I have found pictures of the factory as when first opened 1936 and now But can't fine anything as to why they were giving away bottle openers
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 17 July, 2016, 02:47:57 pm
This took was used for ?
Arnold or one side Fairfax the other side is the wire bit original if so why
Ian

Hello Ian.
Spray gun disassembly and cleaning. Does that seem plausible?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 July, 2016, 09:00:09 pm
Hi Scott I think you are right look at this list
http://htpaa.org.au/hand-tools/australian-tools-makers/australian-wrenches
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 July, 2016, 02:37:25 pm
This tool was used for ??
The middle bit turns around from a flat screw driver to a pointer
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 July, 2016, 06:04:50 pm
Hi Scott I think you are right look at this list
http://htpaa.org.au/hand-tools/australian-tools-makers/australian-wrenches
Ian
Hello Ian,
That' a great site. Some very interesting stuff in there. Thanks for posting.

Cheer Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 19 July, 2016, 12:59:26 pm
Hi Scott I think you are right look at this list
http://htpaa.org.au/hand-tools/australian-tools-makers/australian-wrenches
Ian

Ian,

Thanks for that site. I bought a lot of my tools between 1948 and 1955 when Australia was still making such things, so there are a lot of familiar names there.

On the page you linked to they show a photo of Keesteel multigrip type pliers. I bought a pair of these (still have them) probably about 1950 because they were the first of the non-slip type I had seen. They would have to be one of the most uncomfortable-to-use tools ever manufactured! The handles were left square with sharp corners; no attempt was made to round off the corners or remove the burrs. Then they were nicely chrome plated straight over the rough edges - sore hands guaranteed every time they are used. They never slip though.

I also have several Dowidat spanners and shifters like those illustrated, both German and Australian made. The finish on the Australian made ones is inferior to the German ones, though it does not seem to affect their usefulness.

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cowman on 20 July, 2016, 08:26:47 am
Scott
The tool to the left of the brake spring remover in photo 5 is a pair of "Maspro" pliers. There is a groove in both the jaws which accepts a "Maspro" clip. It is used for attaching netting to wire or wire to wire in fences or trellising.
Cowman
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 July, 2016, 10:55:57 am
Hi Cowman
Are you talking about this one (picture) if they are the same as mine (picture) there is no grove in the jaws
The brand name on mine is "Danielson" and I first thought ""Maspro" clip' pliers BUT there is no grove so how do they work?
Mr Google came to the rescue and they are "Battery Terminal Pliers" like the one now on E-Bay
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Vintage-Cornwell-Battery-Terminal-Pliers-7-5-/282104204148?hash=item41aeb88b74:g:RPoAAOSwOVpXewgd
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 21 July, 2016, 03:19:01 pm
One more odd one, did not know it was bronze/gunmetal until I went to clean it up
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 July, 2016, 12:30:37 pm
Should of put a tap beside it so you can see how big it is
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 24 July, 2016, 04:32:09 pm
Glad you put a tape beside and not a tap, as taps come in different sizes too.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 July, 2016, 05:19:48 pm
Hi John yes I think my key board it getting worn I find on some keys you have all but hit the key that is the key pad on the computer
Yes I saw the error after I posted
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 24 July, 2016, 05:38:26 pm
Glad you put a tape beside and not a tap, as taps come in different sizes too.
Hello all
I don't know about you lot, but my tapes come in different sizes it seems. I have some that measure 100mm longer or shorter (99% of the time shorter) then the rest.  But the problem is only ever intermittent on any one tape.
I'm just baffled why I get the shorter tape when-ever I cut something that's worth a sqwillion dollars a metre but if I cut knotty pine the same tape will measure bang on.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 July, 2016, 09:01:48 pm
Ha ha ha Scott you have to bring your tape up to room temperature before use otherwise on a cold day it will shrink and on a hot day expand  ;D
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 25 July, 2016, 08:54:39 am
Hi Scott,
Your tool box, and especially your tapes, have been infected by the virus known as "100 mm Harry" Be warned, there is no known cure or anti-virus to ease the symptoms. It can and does affect anyone, at any time, but usually when the required measurement is most critical. It is, however, only known to affect tapes with metric measurement printed thereon, which would indicate that it originated in Europe somewhere.

Good luck and much understanding from one who also has been infected.

Cheers, Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 26 July, 2016, 08:12:52 am
Hello Steve,
Mate, I thought about that virus and thought it may have been something to do with those fancy European diseases they get over there in European land so I brought some of those 'hybrid' imperial-metric tapes which I thought was new/old stock from Australia.  It seems the 100mm Harry disease only affects 1/2 of those tape measures. Not 1/2 of the tapes as in numbers....1/2 the tape as in only 1/2 of each tape measure. It only affects the metric side and not the Imperial side for some reason. So I thought...cheap imported tapes, so I got some more 'hybrids' of a different brand. Inflicted with the same disease.
I hope they invent a pill for 100mm Harry. I'm sick and tired of my dad laughing at me when 'Harry' strikes his curse. Harry never strikes my dad down. He's Imperial all the way.
As a side note: Why does 100mm Harry only inflict tape measures? I use metric and 'hybrid' steel rulers a lot, and the disease does not seem to be able to infect them. Is it because of good BHP steel in steel rulers?

Ian, no matter where I go and what the temperature is....that 100mm Harry strikes at the least opportune moment. I reckon the name of the disease should be 100mm Murphy 'cause that Murphy fella hates my guts as well.

Cheers then
Scott  :)
PS: I'll take a picture of the result of 100mm Harry later (if I remember). Wasn't funny at the time but worked out well in the long run.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 26 July, 2016, 08:19:13 am
Hello again
Actually had a picture on file.
Notice the overhang of the roof on the float? It's exactly 100mm. We sat the roof on the floor to measure and marked the outline on the concrete for references and measured and measured again but 100mm Harry struck.
In the end Murphy got Harry. The overhang works well as an awning to stop rain going in the back.
Cheers Scott
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/5KlkuYH4BsLGtspATZ-Wxrg5Xs1GQhquhID6iAogd25jSp55yn8Z2y2_AlBr3TaiBLc_z7HukfYJDxaLjg4OydRzeQcRiIMswHkSoVjldxCnWS5viVULpWEd5M4ypSYQjpx_JNMEsXvNuuWr6YjXDSzKnUzOAdjmin3Dluv8znyjQ7oxoDbw8N_a-ZlsuPEjbMKvq-YtSqXjRt_WP_5pLjgr381gd-Lt3oN_j6FI7Vq-9VwAJmjYgw29Pu0j8sYaoukjfLbGTl_xgaixUi20Y1_WQVawNOL2kY4i6Fpt1Z9Q-tC9a_b3Xu_vcgSUHPN8HBk_fzmcV1mDp5o4gReBScFhza0m9ZB4K3igvCS1ByNfmh9b1-CaOY6I3TjvGSnvnaYYuIKC5p96uuEzGNhK0n7RTapwLdr8c4EDuUUc8IzUjXFsBrBlF2yaYPjMqhQUS2_ZwqCOOJ41mNKR_tWG3XMXzfijLQtsIDHajqe4TidPc-aDzYkboSkbk_ZwAdMTxHlYH_zkUMjuFuv5jZ21riF5-Wz2JaXy5FlFPDKbZRaeuCxN3mxbnKomVvFA1zBwXoXSSyQDDKeGIo0J3KOSE8aM5dVv9ik=w427-h643-no)

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 26 July, 2016, 05:33:21 pm
Maybe 100mm Harry doesn't effect your metal rules as they are shorter than the standard 100mm!
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 26 July, 2016, 05:58:33 pm
Found  100mm Harry rulers  ;D
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 04 August, 2016, 05:10:26 pm
Vintage glass cutter
Anybody seen one like it
There appears to be something missing where the slot is
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 05 August, 2016, 01:40:24 pm
Hello Ian,
Would that have been a glass tube cutter?

If you like old tools look at this cattledog I found whilst researching something else. A lot better the the Bunnings one we got this week I;ll give you the drum.
It's amasing how much stuff in there is in our shed as well.
http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52802622/view#page/n66/mode/1up (http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-52802622/view#page/n66/mode/1up)
And another I found is Montgomery/ward from 1895
https://books.google.com.au/books?id=AjqYCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA359&lpg=PA359&dq=tanite+saw+sharpener&source=bl&ots=9Q5m6ElY7o&sig=Oul0X9UKm8OnJjWE38ClHh4u444&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixzbDYv6bOAhUBNJQKHX_0BlgQ6AEIMjAE#v=onepage&q=tanite%20saw%20sharpener&f=false (https://books.google.com.au/books?id=AjqYCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA359&lpg=PA359&dq=tanite+saw+sharpener&source=bl&ots=9Q5m6ElY7o&sig=Oul0X9UKm8OnJjWE38ClHh4u444&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixzbDYv6bOAhUBNJQKHX_0BlgQ6AEIMjAE#v=onepage&q=tanite%20saw%20sharpener&f=false)

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 05 August, 2016, 02:17:58 pm
Hi Scott
Here is a picture of one I found getting close to mine
For cutting flat glass not tube
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 August, 2016, 07:32:55 pm
Not quite a tool
Look how it is made all one piece
The owner said made it the 1920s and was common at the time
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Mightgo on 13 August, 2016, 08:39:15 am
Hi Ian,You Would not read about it,had one of those hanging around here & sent it to the tip in a rash clean up last week.                                                 Brian.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Mightgo on 13 August, 2016, 08:47:48 am
Also there was another one made the same only it was a candle holder,as i said sometimes you have a brutal clean up & then regret it                      Brian.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 15 August, 2016, 05:14:18 pm

Hi all,

Just harking back to 100mm Harry; as I've recently retired and getting the chance to catch up on things around here, I have just completed a three day project in wood, not my favourite medium to work with. The project being a new letter box in the shape of our house, complete with a multi faceted pitched roof. 100mm Harry didn't bite me at all this time but as you can imagine there were several "measure twice, cut wrong once" occasions.

However, undaunted, I have found the ideal way to rectify mistakes like this, without wasting timber.  All you need is a high amperage  "choke"type welder and a handful of wooden chop sticks and Bob's your uncle. Good as new!

Just thought I would share this useful tip with you all.

Cheers, Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 15 August, 2016, 06:20:46 pm
"handful of wooden chop sticks"
My son calls them gap filling rods
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 03 September, 2016, 11:53:24 am
2 more to the collection 
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 06 September, 2016, 11:35:10 am
The brand is also on the screw nob
The end looks very much like a chisel, is that what it was used for
Ian   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 06 September, 2016, 11:36:53 am
The smallest 'hog ring pliers' I have seen
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 06 September, 2016, 11:38:53 am
One more what were these called
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: bigmoot on 06 September, 2016, 03:54:46 pm
GDAY we used these when i worked at T BOOTS AT WINDSOR NSW BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS regards bigmoot.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 06 September, 2016, 05:47:07 pm
One more what were these called
Ian
Hello Ian
They're for wheel weights aren't they?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: bigmoot on 06 September, 2016, 07:25:32 pm
THIS IS WHAT THEY LOOK LIKE REGARDS BIGMOOT.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 09 September, 2016, 12:27:32 pm
Some more
The one in the middle is ???
I have had  good look at it the hook part and it is square to the other surface  no file marks no hacksaw marks can be seen so if home made they did a good job BUT why that shape
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 09 September, 2016, 03:43:22 pm
Hello Ian
have you got an old pushbike around the place? if you have, try that funny spanner on the headstock bearing. It might fit. Probably won't.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 10 September, 2016, 08:32:40 am
The spanner on the far right, in the first photo, is a BSA motorcycle carburettor spanner. Used on the WM20's etc.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 10 September, 2016, 04:13:53 pm
I also think that the same spanner on the far right is also another push bike spanner like many if not all of the others.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 10 September, 2016, 06:50:25 pm
Quote
I also think that the same spanner on the far right is also another push bike spanner like many if not all of the others.

It's BSA part No. 15-8945. It's specific to BSA's.

Google it.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 11 September, 2016, 01:32:06 pm
The 4th spanner appears to be for either an RV or PT Cooper.

http://ozwrenches.com/cooper.htm (http://ozwrenches.com/cooper.htm)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 September, 2016, 04:37:46 pm
"The 4th spanner appears to be for either an RV or PT Cooper."
Good. thanks
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 September, 2016, 08:27:40 pm
Did you lose some tools ?
I have found them
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 06 October, 2016, 08:10:06 pm
Disston Backsaw
Which dates back to the 1930s or earlier
Note made from 'cast steel' which helps to date it
Ian   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 07 October, 2016, 07:25:57 am

Love the art work Ian, but what is attached to the wheel in the background of the first photo? Come on give us the "Big picture".

Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 07 October, 2016, 09:53:37 am
Hi Steve don't know it was here
http://www.historicvillageherberton.com.au/
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 07 October, 2016, 07:11:10 pm

 Sorry mate, but knowing how good and varied your collection is, I thought you were holding out on us.
Cheers, Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 October, 2016, 02:17:44 pm
Another saw
Going by the shape and the locking bit 1950s ??
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 October, 2016, 02:22:30 pm
How would this clamp be used or was it part of something else
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 11 October, 2016, 06:15:34 pm
Hello Ian
I'd guess a bit earlier for your saw. Saws similar to that started getting alloy handles in the 50's I thought. But I'm more then likely wrong.

Are you bringing some of your tools to Oakey Ian?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 27 October, 2016, 10:20:25 pm
Interesting pliers double ended
These are owned by Scott
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tanksmate on 27 October, 2016, 11:53:28 pm
tHAT sure is an interesting pair of plier.s  luv em.  Cheers John
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 November, 2016, 06:37:25 pm
Some people just have to much time on their hands
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 November, 2016, 07:28:02 pm
How would this clamp be used or was it part of something else
Ian
Hello Ian
I have a funny feeling that clamp is for holding down sickle mower sections for sharpening.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 01 November, 2016, 07:52:23 pm
Thought I'd try to join in on this topic.
Something different?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 02 November, 2016, 09:14:40 am
Hello Rex
Mate, is that a brake drum measurererer?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 02 November, 2016, 10:03:22 am
Gidday, no. It's just a general measuring tool, I think from the 50's. (presumed you would have one  ;)   )
Pretty cute eh? The second pic may give you a better idea of the size, has some graduations.

Cheers

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 November, 2016, 09:53:38 am
Hello all
Rex, yep. Very cute and probably very useful.

Here is something I picked up this week. I reckon everyone on this forum would be able to use it.
A KLG Plug Service Centre from the mid 60's it seems. It cleans the plug and tests it under compression.
The bloody thing wasn't working on Wednesday but a 1/2 day on it solved the main problem of the spark making dodad not making sparks.
What was the reason for no sparks I hear you say. Cobba is going to love this.....the 12v Oak vibrator unit was broke. So I pulled the Oak vibrator apart (not as easy as it sounds as it was sealed) and gave it a good going over. A capacitor was also blown which is probably why the vibrator broke. So now a brilliant spark.
A complete rewire also happened as the old rubber insulated cables were....well buggered.

Once the plug is clean, you put it in the testing side and there's a little mirror at the bottom that you can adjust to see the bottom of the plug. One the scale there is a scale for pressure and spark plug gap. The knob on the front of the scale is to adjust plug gap. The lever towards the front adjusts air pressure which mimics combustion chamber pressure. You dial up the pressure until you see the spark doing something it's not supposed to. You then look at the red needle and reference it to the plug gap scale.
Anyways, it's working well now so it's sitting on a shelf in the house. I wonder how long it'll take until it's noticed and other sorts of sparks start to fly?  Probably lucky I'm going away for a week tomorrow ;D

Oh, it has a few adaptors to screw plugs into the testing side as well.
Something else I noticed. When your using the spark making dodad it knocks out the wireless. The wireless looses all reception and doesn't come back on when the sparks haves stopped. And then the wireless comes back on when you make some more sparks. I don't know why but I hope not many people near me were wanting to listen to John Laws yesterday. They might have been quite upset at me.

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/72BDEkwJbBPKxwuilcbzciXySOEAo8P5BL23aoHd0c5mu6b3ieXmt5aXMWxYYMcp8dxCl4prVJlUOPG-VD8VFJxJ8cjjsXUq742NvJIk6pJC3kiEVCFg8CF9pGWlOiGZO68nJe-KFoVlITpAyjOqX6WN1d10mjEffNaV-rQ0WJuCNlOXLEaeqdWC0ywdYsc9ofyiaIBiPVP7o6NKV8VBZGKyvOdlH68LgJgVicTshe8it5tt_IDWSlqJcpwBfEOUZ5TPXh49DCIfm06KEr8eYrm_650S4k9RlxuWdNz4bUpOdRBBDsQOca1bl372xvtkPMgo-rrhiN2g25CCCFxqt8HwH0-kMMaWc67-QvmLIURk8QbZZ0ZpvCyeD5cN5YmHcioX0tYXNLwK4gs4sD8lvkmsIkbDBY-n3gZtecOTUOgmmUf3qNzLsPdxp3AGWxellYaX9UWa1jXiW3_LQMwFXqjuucRBg0WerAmyzKX9yK4gOCL9eSD3ruX5AMmsJRKiit-w_JNj8xHaWEGBgy-RES_KVaDnYHG7oCfd3myLOp4P6I-plp1ILxO3B9f5uLSOwoi1VuSVOZLeU2MMS4dZXAu-stCRqg3ETTWexpj0TXGUWa6t_Q=w425-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/zeso9Sv6knaQkfQ44sbT0NQqxrbtHgNEnCP16NZAk5sozKjBtLXUT1Qs_daBQBV81ZuXwNuAcsasqcpOcraavUFYEY5GlDOlfNeBHg7FBhy9fMMsGoDPmn1qEXnLyjKaSD4JV6dob4UX8skXP_RQNTs6fc1NKmbVZceZeeLoawCRYFBRo2BCYgu2HGO3j4XKxsgEvf7lMGvbKzRgWngMhFWovccCF6u8PiQy6EksynLTeGjuF9fdNjJdp2JptBydtrDt0h5GZAKikYGMQ45r5w_qq6a7nxuT8bZ4ZNcZSc0rMH7jeszoDQRNxePT3fOzePXfpfEKGsMeE2CQqFvwiJ2Cw8lngqY8G7nqz5T4BOP_iIpFMHFXIcvOqOHypQ_Ro4JUvSBeFUBroB3LM3MlMJdi0pbnBpSnuzhDbPu76utKtyXshs4pjcTEn2TWafdgNNqhYBSOMjtpYTKzOSgSQGn9xjBfUDtvAjfHCOlFhtph2fBlBuDo_1PsHyWtmVJeywSVIjwTev1HX5c1NRxrp7rTshXo5mb2J7WsjWgOaOQ5LVsDGOsv_K3B9iX7Jw0-vf8M16ancOhf1wPoT6v4ePAJba54JeTvA_k4wjF6sAl2ah1vIg=w958-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/RqBsJqds_J28YZPm6sT84yE-QkjgZokg3AWBhe2776KPx38zudzAlNyJERpsfMg5b_h1PcQ8RjYd71nz1jvxc5CVifNwM0LkZ42lXt86EeINze_jveVi7477YCBZCEXdn84B9AfwJs3dCjtM9VlT_Rahhe8ri3uWPrGExLKY5gDe7mvL8qaxfInpxiDaH4rfSQCkzlowMYr65AuUMrvtVOG_jpwp0PUyeP8XFuHULh9SJFi_ZbMMK1wQKqTYqyAwlRw-q-z0rqF_xCBcSxZ6FGxMmZ7Afgx01TOB9nuJ1t2xDCUE3u1l5RZDcS5YsciLdx6zRVgmHJJl-cwQ_WYYbP0KKjgZ7OST4vIxlQD4-bVO0dQLBy5EPeNsVxytHXQdB0aVEdFAbK3b3vI79IgxdMWvVkksI-95KzvQ5U23J9UgZ8bM8VlgEjZ52zYm7YHcMnpZiIQ-WG2wxzyPeI0EsbUAoa1pfo-HK8kRGOT71rPDySP7yeM-HYdaTYa7vRV95GAwxKXm7g36qFsfLEA5DkjGgaoDwookMUmws_ZIgYDhws53KTl2BMeKdDrTqEVVLZ3kdJuoBwNGTdkyTzwAZk9Xq9WUtLlwU386R5-CPDKCEv0v8w=w956-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/lP--buik8ipluYApz_e-FdW6V_kdIFcrCFwwULtI_ObkdiE2vca1xgC_WXw_AHsIYG5D9KMFRY6NKMgIYiC9sXCs-j7dLmGU-VIepYPMrhidcsd0fHxa0r7PndMSbVAOYq5wguMqx0zKJKR8LC0p1OIyQ6Z_UXgbZR0k_S1PcU7H_1slrKrkAq3eOK95UH6-Vzp74Xg3zUj1843DSRdFrM2tvvTPfJ5uM40IWDpTKWN4YllgZaVTL5Z60r2vnzP-EAHTV00nYv2hXa84OphygH_UC0v_q_zLqcoUu32gcc6K5tTyMArXExFgf6O1lr1WKEm_QSs960oIc9hJr8n5wsdge2KAQzzvun1KmtWk6MnMxnCehj1-DIAgndw0kYdAwuDedCoeujww76h7MSAMnOjzrP-FpixgjakN3sCY_CsRy4ieMmQ8azWae5AKePO3K9LQ4MkILPmIQaBSMZRo-yBzaTlD5UNEimK0FwewTjNpac71mgnN7suHhJ0OuCRkuh3Bw4aAhQISJbA3wLjB98JqSsBKV0UO1RKdS_Tg7XXUTg8dyN4jvwXgkNQiN4U5MQMFdAmJiKPP1P0tB5SrCfUD8XXOqQBL46uxtMRtj1Piwr4VBA=w424-h638-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 18 November, 2016, 11:46:12 am
Scott,

For a couple of years in the late forties, probably 1948 and 1949, I worked at an ancient garage in Oxford Street Sydney during my school holidays.  About the only "modern" piece of equipment was an earlier version of your plug service centre. I don't remember an abrasive cleaning ability - if it was there it was not working. It had separate holes for 10mm, 14 mm, 18mm, 7/8" and 1/2" NPT plugs.

Even in 1948 a lot of automotive parts were still in short supply or very expensive in the aftermath of WW2. The owner was a bit of a bower bird, and would never throw anything away if it could have any possible conceivable future use. Among other items he had accumulated were several buckets full of used spark plugs.

One of my first jobs was to clean these using a broken hacksaw blade with a taper ground to match the taper of the plug's insulator, blow them out, check the gap, and test them. They were then sorted into those that failed under 60 psi which were rejected, those that failed between 60 and 80 psi, those that failed between 80 and 100 psi, and 100psi or better. These were then sold for, I think sixpence for the low testing ones, then a shilling for the next bracket, then one shillings and sixpence for the "good" ones. There was no lack of buyers!

I had an aircraft plug someone had given me. On the tester it was still sparking happily at 150 psi, the shop compressor setting.

Since he was only paying me a pound ($2) a week it was probably a profitable exercise. Most of my schoolmates used to go to the big department stores wrapping Christmas parcels for about seven pounds a week, so I was making no fortune - I think I learned a lot more than they did though.

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 18 November, 2016, 06:13:29 pm
Yip, remember using one during my apprenticeship. You could load up the air pressure and see how they performed.
Isn't it amazing how long spark plugs last nowadays? Pay more for them, but they certainly last longer. I suppose that's one advance in the auto field. I don't like some of the advances, but I do like the comfort of quiet powerful diesels in comfortable air conditioning and not using much fuel along the way. I miss the old cars, but not all of their "features"
Rx
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 November, 2016, 06:57:16 pm
I miss the old cars, but not all of their "features"
Rx
Hello Rex,
Mate, you need a Kingswood. Old school charm with most of the conveniences like air con, power steering, cruise, central locking and all that caper.
When I first met my beloved, she was up me for driving an old car. She had just brought herself a new E36 318 iS Mtech and thought it was the best thing since slice bread. Then she drove The Kingswood. The beemer was still the best thing since sliced bread but she really enjoyed driving The Kingswood. Sad thing was she could go through a tank of fuel in about 30kms. She loves that carbi sucking fuel noise and the dual exhausts out of the V8  :-\

Cheer Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: allisb on 18 November, 2016, 08:02:54 pm
Too right. Could live with that. Love the old V8s, but couldn't afford to run one nowadays! Had a lovely V8 Falcon Wagon for a few years. 4 barrel holly, twin pipes. Ahhh, yesssss. Memories!
But I digress
Rx
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 19 November, 2016, 01:49:41 pm
Convert them to having fuel injection, should be simple enough to do from a wrecked late model V8.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: David Syme on 04 December, 2016, 01:23:59 pm
 Same style as a blacksmiths leg vice, well made and had some use, no name. May be for light metalworking. Needed a T bar and clamp washer.
David.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 05 December, 2016, 02:53:38 pm
Have seen blokes who make models use these.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 06 February, 2017, 02:34:31 pm
Hello all
It's been awhile since anyone has posted tools so here goes.
The first is a shifter I brought at the Allora Rally. I thought it would be a useless bit of kit when I found it in a box of rubbish, but worth buying for nothing other then been unusual. But how was I wrong. It's actually really good to use. I thought the adjustment would simply slide out of place and rounded nuts and bolts would be the result. But a double gear drive to the adjuster lets the shifter to be super firm in the slider. Unbelievable, but true. Even the adjusting slider has less play in it then a brand new Sidchrome hanging on the wall. It's in the every day use tool box now

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/dGEwT4rk8AUOlScSRcSoUQSJd9zdv1_B-tyg13fvbSIPJY0_s59zDFjYfbN6BWv5c8EYM37x_rpoJv3yhiNcFe2pu1TxuFT6R_BHXGyDEUOHZn4tyuec-ipcCDGFRP-Ixrc3W3Uh1-tGzNpQedbLX7NncadJl-U3gt0YHmueTik0WbplqJatAExiFoA7796WJqLQIUQtxzZHuBZhmaSRaX0ErZFzysMG-de7yvkAmmIIFXR3xooC18Gc9HSyoQE-OGbWSjAb_PbwEuLml13eHaIKHQCnk4Jim_T0O-CuB7NPNWHSDKIK9Fn2bPpYutNbFTS1J0QSYo8O8_b9ZQMu2wTbwJb_aX6Bo0v08C_BUpo-O0ayIel6lA_CD4_A3FF5ClWZZALthVX5rVYi1rwqvk8TaiWE6U8vhT8jCsX_IkE-duBbW4E1A2BBYkKNxMk1H5lQAVDzmKEjI69M_cFdEG84gaafgDaQF7eaV1jb-4ahx1AFvq1AOUkQPUQgKyXC9JLslMCpXbV4Q0tjJGPcBqzgWba0Oj63S_YDfXk9O7kxjhmHhRh3QUltQeJNjlvDhn0CHxUaVkzUtXLPuYYRt63od6jm5JDPaWwjfnGNTMWaPZUmu7n7j7HU6KM057xZpaw02-xe8JRjfpVDtcFeyusnGsB-mJmkkG-1iuyXF08=w959-h638-no)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ja3JwmRL5omPKbGI9KT6Df0HR4D08qKouFEq-NEBsAFJM6giec0d_3rrqqQb-QCa5GYtBiynbvgqxcGLqcLHNhHh9qNSpgZ16te_xhMXXcoL_RwMSJuku6vW7lWeDR1QojftL58xCsoorcKqjEJ-Er2sa82NoAZILxHMvYIVwBJK0Vj-m4Ca_M4K4xsnNNzikgdMW-lxfU9UEwWwbOq203Ma9SUpbmaGdXZ-iXrG3tgBMXhb2W71xnTMx-o0TGNcnKU8zl5IV8WJpJjXJraQJr0-j8-42GeDwbRsvhBUlj5PnjdETc9NhvrsKn-L16mmCAIR669wStlP8m4O8M3YkDl34cMApRruTHluqvdVZmX00q0_SJzJBETiRMh40AnQluE5AVskLdqwwiwet60OaI6odlDsroHnUkLTcHvCJQ8qMed3PIww0mk1m0lXWeNrCjEf61Yow088xsw1R-eoLVD1tBDAtjtER0F-_Ic2R0FyDT9CpMVCt7V3QJalDZIYJmn8RQfzMnD6CmmkzjvRF3se58GRFXnq-yDDE2-8X9kd_ZZ7x984Qmr8eKAx6E8AhGT3jSAoJplwrK_4kF_1teaWzMtwLPy4N6I-sk18Y5LWFy65bseJdkeEyB_gM5_MSedUvxeggyoPvSpQ06Od1KWzyIoRTyDt2u6ZQpZEhk=w956-h638-no)

Then we have a wonky looking screwdriver. Anyone younger then 70 know what it's for?
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/h0LeSzxUzT7r1EVf6zSsYzFCJ7FQn3Z1wWgYE1QRvMc-WieOXF1xflypqREzDak2dr_-bMNXzZ2lJsffqD5-AH-iXq_NB8l4OeHevlgzniKc7aOelvRGIxpXzjxEND7dgNTN298ysF3Z7bzYUK26ePNZf0FwaMdkfQF3EdvlxJJYAG3i8VtpOLCOKSVcu4O_JijoGWTFYQxEnGjECX_0Nn_AHIgqR3UolRhxWDBkuA-3dRRqSwMhIbv_W7-9k1hVfV_3JlLRE5ApoS5rSMTCouEvWvr8floJejYrHp_06Kwdrl7dyrHdkjZXXrDkqvuTUlhWiLjfBYXWJXKsfK_E2rlJQ-Fbu35sU-UpFOZubl55R5caCb6ffJP2AvioUSWkWgkJwZJUf7FSRxI-OdmneEcW2TguXZSfi70Q1sTzRXLK-Jlqzphk1YteW8hNq65yqrHTE9D3TAXAXg4PcRT0jVLP5h93vt3R0lB6Pz-njIIqCLnqVxfmpVrgxBkyJeUerkEBF9TV1X6xbcgAVfDIaKF5RDMXREcdkPIbZwI6aJ8PSSyHWaQGvyvwD_8qRT6UfSB_92gYgwOzFpd722Gy2oq6CI4PhyIH1-9pfLD1HpCxidVB17ZulOHNVI9_MMkBYWnSjh_pS3rzn3_ApBTvVDIJFRhBOYWIGwVmxlG7wsk=w956-h638-no)

Then we have the old "Trusty" screwdriver. It's quite nice to use as well
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/3SDKXkQOJ77ws-0sG4G9uIrwblZCQcnmJjZkpKfP9N7KQbtbXDZPVTtf-aEbMVmd945-vdr27AML4JZytA9SZIJhgDxH_tJEW5HYSLqD-ULT9Htno9iJ9SB-aXw8Ghgwnb_UrySIeAR2LpOb4XxyOXCVgtxU3AOihbf6AewjP6lRpF7gMXW7fFDjSRchPBRLyviPWa32XKacmWMdZdCD_gJhGUIE7ZWhf-Y3Dr-S2iN3cTYbKxHe4xo25wW0LpT72VfH4ihccd93_H106iZmTqREdRjIlPUykDW95R8khCpPGBxHqjLWrm-_p4pBKtwbpbqMZK9t0y42aSWVyRRowC8L9xoaWpmWvlXcJsyzrmH_A73GsG4ZlpD5D6qcjCu5QSx9D77cRdbJFZXKtVPkEZffWf26tbpsJBw3E_Hb-37eYORCv7CCv8O-jamKVLBVJCGT_qUONwivuqqYE-noTjaBQw75R_j_Pyzh2cWEnAc6FFVBN63r7lcRiLRT8q6w_H-xiJ40Ev8gQZDYrVgH-9fqgQFSxSIsDh8E0fchWPwZ2EbDXSUG8EmGQp_6n3_03VAMDvKlfCAinVZ1xA74D_NYCfNOZ75Nw3QWK1acdKesOMos0bvb7MrMRJlgFy-thLL0x00LVIPO6WMvVxsZHOOLPUAcrgUoAmHZjIS35dg=w956-h638-no)

Now we have a tool that still gives me nightmares. I don't know if what we used it for was the right use of the tool but my dad had me using a similar tool to punch holes in sheets of roofing iron to put roofing nails into. I was only about 10 or 11 to start and spent days on roofs with a string line, one of these and a hammer. Why does new iron have to go up in Summer?
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/PBGK2yw6Q9802QhaFlLkoqFM0JKWK-JwvgQ1MGEOi0riB7itwkdgsfeYwwXVnwfLbxbFRpg2PPFP281GyW6DCTu9hXuAciD19Kqmo4kMQ2QtrIE4k2V7xI9uGTIZQn6_0Ayo7Xy20_nkwFZtbj1Hekizm6WP3H17Kk9qCnLt1ssWFq8fOEK_ONBiPXg0_0TiFvdWPQhZfTh9jw0IfeUuJrPshYu7Si59Z3_rSXyoTIGylU50GzWK8mAk1c4TcEPfhZSTWlZqgu3iGL_D3c8cfCaIktbHhDB71kL2woeb0OsHluFipQ22i6DtHbCjaQTB0XkahayjBzKzVsjcMbw8viG9Zv6Mt8GoDDqysdcmK9nNJ4qSaTrJm4eykB7_wwY9vUBbtoJC2hZyqvN9SSfNdDQGeXUe4My1ZvrvOJ4q7fzugxI2nd-3JWzKZARF9rYxRlYKAhcR5icDmVHFN2iPFU0Mj4OZYg9C2CRAxH4Ap7iVuthH8G-JMPkAsBkzChFZz2Ri-FaLWiaBb0x5CGpABn1zjCAMUOvT3gaYQ-eBxg5MZEMVKVd8VGqaBXztUhwnW17nTS7kFttcsuYCOby2KYaOZ-XQCB5WdKzI_PrZTlFuOjO1j3fpdLPQGayfy-AUl9UWuhCyr0yEi-JMkFJSDH94Uvz8Kt34V14_AH1CBOs=w851-h638-no)

That'll do for now.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 06 February, 2017, 05:07:20 pm
That second screwdriver, I think has the attachment to hold the screw on the end of the blade. It's only a guess as I haven't seen one like that, but I'm sure I've seen modern screwdrivers with a similar style of attachment.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 06 February, 2017, 05:16:22 pm
I'm with you on that tractorfan. With the last item I had to buy a new version of that when I started panel beating. It was to be used for aligning holes when mounting body panels. Still have it and I use it a lot but not for the use that Scotty mentioned, banging holes in roofing iron. I'm glad they have self drilling roofing screws now.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 07 February, 2017, 09:54:01 am
Hello all
Yep, first screwdriver can hold a screw so you can put into places you couldn't normally reach. A magnetic tip screwdriver solves that problem real quick now-a-days. There's a few versions of that screw holder screwdriver laying about the shop here. A lot of work went into them to get a screw to stay put on the end.

Cobba. I never thought about that for the pointy tool. Aligning holes.
If you look at the non pointy end of this tool you'll noticed it's mushroomed a lot. Either panels fitted very badly and needed a lot of persuasion or somebody saw me a s a kid. Either way, I'll use it the same way you did. Aligning stuff.

Here's a couple of pairs of pliers.
The first is A Wilkinson Tool from merry old England which was made in 1959. About 10" in length with a funny set of jaws. Anyone know why the funny jaws? I wonder if they were for wire beading when working with tin?
The second is a 7" pair made by E.A. Berg of Sweden. Nice pliers to use. They might go into the everyday box as well. The wire cutter on the side is a nice feature.

And then we have mystery set of cutters. Made of stainless with no brand name. They have a badly closing set of jaws on them. Only the tip will cut. Not even any good in the boat with the jaws the way they are. Anyone know their intended use? To me, they look medical or dental.

Cheers Scott
 
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/tlRtnKLD7DSyB4pZcgggL4YOwwlBAap3GzJQHcaWf5kC27zpa5sbbKOLBw8Q-oUS64am4J8FDTgieqvH0kndaWaPVjqrcUHkjrpX93Ap0YCHuVILW6xhdgM1neXJQ8oPbTtenA0kT1a8QDnxJp__iWTJcUY02ppafwkrgDUAxbtrp3xSL_slczZVk4eT33xAuWzYImFE_tQf5wdoNvkiTvjSQ_qF0LfhveNB6rPaoPNf-TMxGzaUaWZ5x-zUQ_W6v-YlqTjSRFpi48k0vxsunmbTt3xAZ8et7LiC3jr5tj5tzE20-3Coh0Ln-BXSyqEg51YrJFg0CPqr3aFW4RWRFxNQ_J9gCOzXNtY_BMNOuJrUWp69Z_l15xlm-QuziWFR89GVuhjNotJH2HrXtB3d5eHoFfK4dZPPkWRG3zGBnbbKmFXqa2Ha2G0qFGdM4r0DfeOwVTiWp-V8MWbEGpbyZB2kd0qY_rTkISQ5Zt4D0btKnldfTxnQNwiXx-8mbOh24mdvclm7wrtjewLU7BNB2w7rgCeca992HoqPD_TXiVlZge05kDULtqpZK6AWIZGQqYfoFT36X6bxsWy1BP5SdT_7S4h-lnhv-d8nxEiUJMcXleyMm82IYsbnG7F81kjLmfuF97V0Vnhrxp1rWYRw-PCOqA99O3QtOoiJBqN146M=w958-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/xH_M__sdPRLJyEM0ODKfpxeoc6lc1Ga02UClWizD4VDcJ5woUgNT_HRpZDWSfoYfzGNfj0_qzNrmi3MqosWHh_2zJRWumCo_xUwJEvfaOBO_2sUMJNzb7kjYe8w3S5Tf9gev6F6nx7qrsrbs3ecRBYb7odDTY1obGnKv7ipGkCrvuxe7osULP2TfIaZA3xg3h-Sph4PNMiM4epuxjZ2W1mxXScvZBOc6uwqCj6aXubxCogab7Kcq6XZe8qoAlp2dXrwJOGFkvzjOgcVfgJm5rwras03JhlaWNSBeKR-d_t2F2i67O2-u8PKIzTy3A4XVatF-NN_gFM421XjDTzjtSKYN87_Zs_Xe9z_bZjVkzm_Ma57CKryBVIS4FeeqES9pBYPOEeEZ81Q_Yqa9toaJTIBXt4E41e1xuCAWERuffCscLOhInIDEJZeQOI-wjO1x15T3-_QiWLwhBykc10_Vlsd7l5CpeOCxYn-9BryFevvU7aMzbB7ZsjOmaISwifiOFta0HGENik_n4CY0OwBnBrglSq65icNnc3-n1Fw3WK0wcr5Iovr8Dne3hU1QMWUxwT1mIfWUDx_-ycib2s1w4Fo-7-5aP5YdxVMS6-JyB72fXmJtv9spZkB213z9Sqgr2_8CdcKf_QNRZ2zyeAnvgJykep9ivO5akNdibx5XR9o=w956-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6IjXl_1HySd8S6wPgs34pEq7oOKIPQ8vB4kY07Ruw8-ytrsPiJIv8flzuYH0W2DhxAXPS7QdFfrbM4vUxemjsDQJyd0wB0QCHUvviPkVXVE0TA5b6SjzarjyEukRGJQE8tyrS896LY6nY4ELc5fe1iYPh5KDODsyA5vCY4ZDol9DkJAZQeOw5mEpbee4qmoDL8lS2HO7A-PQO5u0OkN8QBKvFLL4wze-JZ1n4mP3NRDEwzQFA8uemcq1cr6BAI1GASJv11REwh6IYOg-BXta-OOxoqxZozBPn10myQ9lmm3DqNTR3kK8i1t2hxhsYUpD6SbiFt7YwsleoXJlViMYbgs_12owVE-0JL1z6P6OM-NnJyUU0AKv5sz7SOzOPqe6KNm1TDOHK-7SkVi_yG9kBIeu0h6djWwoCJxenxw-_gKqJPi1FLfrlPbvvzJofdBHVa1eQHAKX1LkaKbLLFz877psH2drd-DacnVZo-fo9GYI1CHHfDdLv2nGHR5PExAdZf3QI01sgUpV8HEBq--H1KTiMxrS6reMg9enYl6JBxIXGwpH4C9DvZx9X52C95rlGAX3XFke422N9XUSelskcUvTA0hAAQyNap3nn37g-tIur8M1wwM5YO8Himg6sNXUCkwWXI5jhh5nymIQGi7sk9AnjYyuzLJO8_PPVjCLoz0=w958-h638-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Oldengines on 07 February, 2017, 11:57:14 am
we used same cutters for finger/toe nail cutters when growing up, dad still uses them.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 07 February, 2017, 04:40:32 pm
Hi Scotty, both sets of pliers have 'wire cutters' and both have side cutters as well. The side cutters are obvious but the wire cutters are the small notches at the back of the jaws, open the pliers, place in the wire and close the pliers.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 07 February, 2017, 04:47:46 pm
we used same cutters for finger/toe nail cutters when growing up, dad still uses them.
Hello all
It's hard to see in the picture but these cutters are flat like side cutters. Our toenail cutters are curved. Are your dad's flat or curved?
We broke a set of the curved blade toenail cutters cutting dad's toenails once. My Dad's toenails are like saw blades to cut. All us kids hated that job.  :P

Yep, sure noticed the cutters on both sets of pliers Cobba. The ones on the Wilkinsons are quite worn and battered. The ones on the Berg's are rather nice. I'll have to hide the Bergs from Mrs Scotty so she doesn't pinch them for girlie fencing pliers. She has a habit of losing tools in the paddock.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: pointed spike Tool
Post by: tanksmate on 12 February, 2017, 11:54:52 am
Hi Scott,  that pointed spike tool that your dad used to punch holes into roofing iron is correct.  I used one exactly the same ( and still have it) and used it in the late 50"s when I was an apprentice plumber. Roofing Iron or corrugated iron used to be soft and then it started to be made hard or hi tensile. A roofing nail would just slide off the top of the corrugations and take a chunk of the finger with it. A very pointy spike was needed to start the hole. I dont know how many times I took a gouge of flesh off the side of a finger trying to hold a nail and start it off to hammer it in.  Very glad I dont do any work like that today.   cheers.  John
ps, these days I use that spike for lining up machinery onto holes for bolts to go in.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 February, 2017, 10:39:34 am
Pick up another odd one plus a ruler
Made of Alloy very short I would say come of some piece of machinery for a one type of use 
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 February, 2017, 11:10:18 am
The ruler that came with the above spanner
Made by J. Rabone UK number 1397 made from "Box Wood" what is box wood eg type of tree etc 
The best date I can get it was made before 1962 as that is when the company changed names
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: John 54 on 13 February, 2017, 11:38:10 am
Hi rustyengines
The alloy spanner is for doing up milk pipe and hose nuts. All farm pick up milk tankers carry them as well as being used in milk processing plants.
Regards John
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 13 February, 2017, 12:13:48 pm
The ruler made by J. Rabone UK number 1397 made from "Box Wood" what is box wood eg type of tree etc 
The best date I can get it was made before 1962 as that is when the company changed names
Ian
Hello Ian
Boxwood is a common name given to the timber from a number of trees, but all from the same family sort of thing.
Boxwood is a very fine, straight grain making it perfect for rulers and the like because of it resistance to splitting and warping. It's really strong too.
My grandfather used to try and get Boxwood for carving.

Cheer Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 13 February, 2017, 04:20:27 pm
It possibly also got its name from what it was mostly used for, making boxes, eg, fruit boxes etc.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Rustisreal on 04 March, 2017, 08:31:59 pm
Hi Ian , I see you have a few tools on show do you have one of these in the shed , a very handy item in the days gone by.
Noel.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 05 March, 2017, 07:21:11 am
Hello Noel
Is that a paint stirrer?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 05 March, 2017, 08:56:57 am
Hi Noel
Have no idea
What is it ?
I can see if you pull the leaver up and down the middle bit would spin, but the other end looks a bit heavy to be a paint stirrer
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 05 March, 2017, 01:51:43 pm
It's a valve lapper.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 05 March, 2017, 03:20:04 pm
Yes Eric is right
Here is one all but the same
  **  Vintage-Simplicity-Valve-Lapping-Grinding-Tool-Antique-Model-T-Era **
Ian
   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 08 April, 2017, 05:20:27 pm
Here are a couple of pics of some old tools in general found while travelling around Tassie. The little Cooper Wonder Tool was different.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 June, 2017, 08:32:10 am
Hello all
Here is a bit of an unusual tool. It was just one of the items I picked up this last week-end.
We now use it for something totally different to it's original intended use.
Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/VU6yDXNAM_mumFdq_cOW5sprnSMiujLoSmAmpvlkxiYPXrnr5JbJkiorsBhxrQMh5GHuKJbhokIn3oOPfvy9gkUfMu9qIy8jhO0z1nDpUWceuO11PUAHKy0w5quBN0DanTg9qR02SdklXWqQmiDSHAYWVbunEPN_ChhXhltQzEzzfxeEIdLS874a3APwo5dGblKAFkdulPvyox8x2UwHQiQW6iMNVFT-fJ4myQkYTzbpxcHGeb2st9JAKvvO13V0IrPAGwRcAfMQULLsrsPs5GF4eVuxkMep8rhqON_ZVj6hg7IYfPphPew7MxxXg5Fd1I8butwXgP6Ozaw7J4Z49JfCfxu8ixxxFynue4yNFgrun1TfOvoQV91aUX7M2E2ewnnUr2-3P8nhd_tOg0pqYM6lkEFUtemzcJxQGA0r6t6bSNTkxela7iR84u1UaPEv3fn2GXnMAme0om37FX6zysQZ4RJRSAjxiOuyyswum9hAEODr19O9pOiW9C7w8FQbiN8t6z1J9FyRpfAqQIyWAPJjI2enfO-UpyiOIETM_ZGpZDy1sLkPL9Hps54SlCcbX6rnlsbyG259-CriC1OLEGA5PMH74qKlORs0A1WCMlfvgxP-_KoH-DaDL3-4ckxZ0tBqr8XW3efUD7J8S_3xmsqNf0UpJZdu7uHjPvMvMTY=w424-h638-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/i_VQz9FZ8DBIfbHgseViqQ4RYoraYEVYW7XVFea-jGgC_FJj656Y_EuMh6WKrxTzEzGQkiEUdFGJ967t0p3XKUzmvVuK8JUVrw66v0ypleaizT-gW3_z2HOc2TYfvPFjWEZUKvBp4bhmX6GX75j2dks6fy-0bD8qhGKwJ0xW6rA1b3OrOLxckgJXOfVxCuM_-NNRGTRa7inp2A7g2Fjg13ncqLd6lHj82ZZREE_s1dY5jl9fPq1FQYtcQDcVqLKA0T_1BbzOOkmUupt0tktyEWdCwBe9FHmYeYI_tCRiE53YckolkNYmaFNVMuM9fAANinVUukpPDM5HBrotFHJRxczaJRtExwOUiMpkFkv-L1AhJ3xwusMcGfNgTb07KusrZS5kMgZptKYTNSfxON_DgTRyDklE16mGPMa2WUgZ2IC20_IV0VWfJEHfDEduReZGv1mUMzBwN7F7zOeq2CfAwRJicTUPy9Z2qd1XtHCDU2jMCUHcJ6ZAupFPfarXppe4Oae1dIbGwVbWV-37TkcT-SbdMyP505G4AtUqjLGxyKOHdrpLVCrjtHC0czHBv1fhUZLFrc9eSRj53lurkF4i6JtayAxZkgkwTQ0LgiRibSweudXB-fh-K2MCTZMRnOcbKYeUR7WKnE_GP_jOKgRPeromWUZectW53Nijmz7oNSo=w956-h638-no)




Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: John 54 on 01 June, 2017, 11:28:05 am
Hi Scott
This centrifuge brings back memories of my childhood of the herd tester coming around every couple of months. I had to share my bed room with one herd tester, a really great bloke. That was in the late 1950's early 1960's & i was about 10.
Regards John       
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Frizzy on 21 June, 2017, 04:25:49 pm
It was to be used for aligning holes when mounting body panels. Still have it and I use it a lot.
I believe the technical name for one of these is a PODGER
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Frizzy on 21 June, 2017, 04:30:28 pm
Here's a couple of pairs of pliers.
The first is A Wilkinson Tool from merry old England which was made in 1959. About 10" in length with a funny set of jaws. Anyone know why the funny jaws?
possibly for crimping ? those none reusable hose clamps maybe
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 21 June, 2017, 04:30:36 pm
That's right Frizzy
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 September, 2017, 10:23:33 am
Hello all
This may be of interest to some. Patents of tools, who by and when.
Cheers Scott

http://alloy-artifacts.org/selected-patents.html (http://alloy-artifacts.org/selected-patents.html)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tim on 14 September, 2017, 07:46:03 am
Found this in the scrap heap...any ideas?
There are no markings and I think the second small notch has been added by someone.
Tim
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tim on 14 September, 2017, 07:51:15 am
Another one - has serrations in the jaws. 
Any ideas - Pipe vice?
Tim
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: famous fitter on 14 September, 2017, 09:03:28 am
Hi Tim

Looks like windmill pulling gear ? - Top one to undo rods, bottom one to hold rods up over the casing ?

Just a guess ,Cheers Justin
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tim on 14 September, 2017, 12:12:44 pm
Hi Justin,
You confirmed my thoughts on item 2 but I didn't realise the first tool was related.
Thanks
Tim
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 14 September, 2017, 06:04:54 pm
While I can see how they would be used uncle Google was of no help to find another one
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tim on 15 September, 2017, 12:39:56 pm
Hi Ian - google well pipe holder or clamp and you will get some hits.  There are modern versions available.  I couldn't find anything for the "rod vice".
Cheers
Tim
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 25 September, 2017, 09:38:28 am
The very first post i put up the tool was identified as "Gas Pliers"
Well I have found another one but smaller
Ian
Picture of both to show the difference in size
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 30 September, 2017, 08:50:31 pm
Hi All

Any ideas as to the use of this tool?

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 01 October, 2017, 10:54:04 am
Looks like a tap wrench??? This type usually has a matching pair of Vees in the middle to locate the tap, but I can't see why wouldn't work quite satisfactorily as it is.

Frank

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 01 October, 2017, 02:37:04 pm
Hi Frank

I thought about a tap wrench and tried to put a small tap into it, but it would not open up enough to get it in.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 05 October, 2017, 08:55:33 am
Hello all
Would anyone know what these moulds were used for?
I think they were leather forming moulds but for what I have no idea. There is about 4-6mm sidways movement between the two halves when they're placed together.
Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/r4hAAbrpYPcyxSqr2bHCL2FYmYlDsq3Y_hgKEG3pHzVqgqnv4Awi4s5jc28u1djlox_hs9zhTo5sBFMKnMxAulsjMbpGl2U4eAbyjIXd_Rze1MdvIsRPffwjMa6XKdVKlDBYME2foLwwqAhllG81BEtaPNLcC5ifmxekZLh6byne4tldzgip43taFny1d9TdvGkQjwCyXKqtB9vhdLoX9Kzh6SLUy5V8eiRSOgHxYHoDNfkg3LJ7iTvqRWXpff7fZmUjoZRfPeQuF5aJPff1jjzaMTp3tf356uy5oWOdOA1wYVdUHzchGDLrv_JjeDbwWV_Cee1JLLo7x9DYrafPMXP2uQvH1utznaTeaU1v0jcn3ARX2lod5dy3Uu9IefnSmvxqAjARTeJBe7tPhRFaMnGfYGu69WodmGLYjDGSbBVMBq2Pgmn3BRgV9BYtYaybB6koxTcbbTypUoKIZtjrC_9aFE2A1LoMg05s9fsbslicnTIygOhh2_7hTJjlz-QVPV6MkhE8cxiAEtHYUIp6yS9XNFQSoGVPlIXYKp2QGPlr3qBaYFiLCfcMKoVG-3ILiXNXlAG-RslV_mHeoK67fEFAVH8zJevWHUnLrw9iH7roXj96eKmhZQbxfViLGGUV8ECsJpf8Gwh6kcr5L0rjlMdaXp2t-ILatHKf=w850-h637-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fObDXDKC4aWaBkCF4zyle9D8doKKXf6F8c1MF4VByK-C0PJQE3E1_xcrnyG4NUO_axU2HTAGseT10QcNf9NsLeLLOfEReYFXyjrprCmyAtPUw0nY4tDhMaKvfjvCMASEpYPdJI6Fwd8ottaaxULFjFdvBrYdMyaE4bxUb6kt87Ydg-VTpcD0qHwlD2b6QVpAfI7-A0ML7UnyHuLsccwnJKnwKerR95ubh8EMsvpKyqGhPiISTyNmd3DZV97Ymagf-q7lamRlb9FvWp751cAGnSSbXIF3rPTDpROvoIa4PJCzjFJRnTPN3i4ci_qPSg4GKFQKv6AhuZYlLNZEm7KXNcFaBWrU0Rcb9UVPO5zhDNTzs2PFBMSSNvRiZq6fHL6rRJ777Xsh5wq96jsyZQXEvH9J37m6w-rWV9MC4O3qXs3sI_FNB6uiHHLAvvoUdiUJjXqbA_-btsEpjM_Wd9YPtXrN6rUfthoWxlQGBRRYt0ryhCOhfV2I-aebYaTn7s-9MsKbg7Hzg6lFSqkD52XRG7N3U28TQxT-_mDX0IVa_LP1RBFRtl7f_DVOQlXpXIgsoZ9K1H08-pM_UuSNVDRBNwWCUzctImCsKYwdBcK1mWUE03Uz_VQ15OPpsml5jWIvrRe-E-UC9bBJZkVuz7uR_c4ZI6sfuqoUxSGM=w850-h637-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 05 October, 2017, 01:30:50 pm
Do you know the source of these? Highly unlikely, but there some fair matches if you scroll through here!

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=early+hand+grenades&client=firefox-b&dcr=0&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjrmoDbtdjWAhXFvrwKHaOQBOkQsAQIMQ&biw=1280&bih=655
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 05 October, 2017, 04:26:54 pm
Hollow cannon balls, silly
!
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 05 October, 2017, 09:27:14 pm
Hello
I have no idea what they were used for but hand grenades and cannon balls aren't probably it but what bout bombs? ;D
I forgot that the size is about 150 from the small neck bit to the bottom. Very curious they are.
At the same place is a set of moulds to make blinkers for horse harness gear with a press.
Next trip home I'm going to clean them up and chuck some leather in to see what happens.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 06 October, 2017, 07:03:34 am

I reckon they are moulds for making big balls for the Jolly Green Giant.
Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 04 December, 2017, 04:34:15 pm
What is it
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 04 December, 2017, 04:35:01 pm
Last picture
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 05 December, 2017, 06:48:47 pm
Its made to weigh something small and light with a Max of 80 grams or may be tension or pressure?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 05 December, 2017, 07:37:08 pm
Hello all
Clock pendulum scale?
I don't know but it is curious.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 06 December, 2017, 04:04:24 pm
N, your all wrong!  It's for weighing the fish that get caught in Scottys' dam
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 04 January, 2018, 08:23:04 pm
Ok you Guys

Have a go at this one, what is it and what is it used for? 

its not mine belongs to a friend who picked it up at a garage sale.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: oldgoat on 05 January, 2018, 12:05:55 am
The scale is used for setting the tension of relay springsets and uniselector wipers. Used them 50 years ago until relays went out of fashion in exchanges.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 05 January, 2018, 12:56:44 pm
The tool with the two handles above is a piston ring tool; as you squeeze the handles, the two ends clamp down on either side of the piston ring gap, and move apart. They were supposed to make it easier to install and remove piston rings.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 05 January, 2018, 02:47:11 pm
Thanks for that tractorfan
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 05 January, 2018, 05:50:27 pm
Thanks old goat the tool a bit older than I thought
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 05 January, 2018, 08:50:03 pm
Hi,

This is another tool belonging to a friend in Ulverstone.  Looks to be some sort of a crimping tool but for what?

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 06 January, 2018, 12:58:42 pm
Hello Ian
How big are those pliers?
If they're big.....how does pliers for putting bull and pig nose rings in sound?
If they're small.....maspro (sp?) clips maybe?
I dunno. Just too hot to do anything so I'll have a guess.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 06 January, 2018, 02:10:37 pm
Quote
Hello Ian
How big are those pliers?
If they're big.....how does pliers for putting bull and pig nose rings in sound?
If they're small.....maspro (sp?) clips maybe?
I dunno. Just too hot to do anything so I'll have a guess.

Cheers Scott
Spot on!
http://www.tias.com/8600/PictPage/3923489620.html (http://www.tias.com/8600/PictPage/3923489620.html)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 06 January, 2018, 04:01:29 pm
Woohoo!!    ;D
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 06 January, 2018, 04:08:19 pm
Hot down here too Scotty. did a trip to town today to buy some new very bright PINK paint for the 2nd restoration of PINKY, Dee's mower. The base is now too far gone so confirming availability of a new base and start again. Then lunch time happened and that was that.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 06 January, 2018, 05:53:44 pm
Hi

This is another set of pliers probably for the same purpose.  Pig nose ring applicator.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 06 January, 2018, 10:05:01 pm
When Scott said 'pig', it clicked, they are Hog Ring pliers, for the smaller Maspro type clips. Often used in upholstery, sometimes for fencing, etc.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 January, 2018, 05:30:15 pm
Missing some tools ?
I think I have found them
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 20 March, 2018, 10:32:23 am
Hello all
I bet we've all heard how some people have trouble finding Whitworth spanners.
No problem around here. A huge box full of spanners found at the markets. Sidchrome (old good ones), Ferguson, Ford, Austin, IHC, Amercian and English made spanners. Also a couple of odd spanners. Mostly WW with a few AF and even fewer metric.
Not long before this find (3 days) I found a small roll of spanners in a junk shop while I've been wondering around like Brown's cows. Some may say they're monogrammed. Some more may agree. Question is who's monogram?  ;D

Now the job of cleaning them up and chucking them in the big box of spanners already sitting in the shed. One day I'll sort them out into sets.

Anyone know what the odd looking bent spanners are for?

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/75yLg123tvbpdFKVS7fSYDCJCMfHFzaeUvS_y3yL8lxXcCFmqzjpDJqvkCnR9-a605zn7t7KmIAXsEq40X04izoqq9lzR8ygLcEvWTiOT9yY6d4FqFb5TwJ9o5RiGDfUBbmf8oIUPCRfvPnkwbMYbJIOnOsGCOPEkHlAhAZdl-81GGY6raY0E9Ax1cLWA-nSFKEXtqdG9MnoJC7ogwtWjAlYw6iW9Fzo_RBs4_alpO43uNx83hi57gGev0dmX9NmPToIzI4CQIIn3__la4V5yUMKoNVOEZbEr11TOyg37UbLNLId0fypcJPJYgIRpHjaE4yLlzc06lw8CwuXhZGEF3WYz9hAGksqv44NB7mRdj_aDMegXEPl0Jbp_RPCCTCErV5Z8ia7tfND4rL7Rc6efwxXqbDbOFEzQFcl7RgaxYGwGsHeba23hTzBB3OLYvVAXchXOPiy1XY45fB7v4jOU8GlmZDfspClXPOmgHUb2aO75rF_wOnO2WgblmsdgEdEZkKuvbE5kXAv4qXAwb5ThbFa1ONgCjS0yBeU5VfHVc0QqFQ4CJfgctHq6WqnfBVIo_ZAIDO7LfDwu9uvYTJjO_UelGsR6_CAK20slsf2t2ES2j6cZH4ynCBS0h8A5rMxw8PndWaSoZNZMlHaZsKJ1tQ_ns_VX2vFGQ=w850-h637-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/n5p3ZtsAhY0n7eueAGqOLRIpSU7PwMtbwe9GaKrtUwDP6IHSd_ySoioFX2tsMUjcunY-hc7F2yTDDHWNLSzVgEHuBpY3cCfPngFukLrk3l1FPEF6KwHiekeBwMUo7X1ZJQEl9x96MEMYYJA8Y3jfLHh3xTIwPqrST7MY-IhFDn_Rm2ZnTM0198Ch9YZUg6xrgewkWxTW39FK4XQfGYvu2FlkFwt-IB3QWy9iTVM5AO3mcv2TcsmGCj9CvVNgxaMTWml0mzTLtF09FUHcgyC0r4NKwD75UlsU_wBXII-omVmuKi4RvQfZasgWRJEc_9QHUDtN4eML1UooYriwp4-ddMqRnyBqx06xZq97Z0N8BLhpp5EtbEqfN4uB38UB0N555YLZOS0iuh_XOS_V8ZpOGb_mGxbFeHojhEX4CzLeGxKuUN1xwwz54XLcAZIksnf2dfX1BGeg-HIapg0pciS3teo5sNvwtMYJcP8SRh7JsEFjz8mTWSf4sw6ibz4hPWLj1IG2gfgkfYET0se368ng3Xnq46ms2OyFxUBNlu5KtH8HH9bW3tfAWLCkUxSL51y5GWSsLyJ1ybr8_IiATQ9pb-5skPLXhi6wPPa5LNeKDLmmV0kEJ_hx-AqTq31XbDtPcGcUKpuL8-LljOzHqV4OrpwOHiilmqKQOA=w956-h637-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/HOonF8yThSAhK8NPpC-Y7UzXz45_3LM7V5EQnaUXMokdfNceImyd3MLN0uF_0wL6qh-Ya1FHXCAXzT5rA2OMrLLGM9lnh0QPgwWweO_I66V1DzQFTfHgXgIQaoVX0xOPL2ubZHyq-LcgdxuDWLjuV6ttfq1D3cTh3iFQLfhrFkbZIz-shfzVxGsVZxU-g4zCMJ25Ak3JZEVaOFD5K_Bagg_w_RNU1IYTtnt4n9Rp2QaUrcciaHwoJFYAw4caFWEjRALR4MEuNBE0yDQYYBeRRjbkyWZIvjnRuDlEvzcsfJzyHdVhKjHJsPIycVkvrTriOHNzWaW-HmkLQ6FEv4oiFlXFR4hYR1AIkxfFlIRFWtx02onmIyHcNxEES8ut6gJZF8AcYMFsvNIYpZHpr4oJTjWk_1E1WQStxaXngQKIykUl3Uw7Ova4LfhI4lbbYbz57elz3SGLwY-N8OlAXJTA47YAHvQQOUzJyuQCCUK70viwEYnQFhIsYbzhyGbuVBaNg_zdGRHnVMOnfSWW7q6nIv2UPWiWSyb7ZqYQYhvTDgA6mCDq4cfHsYPScvqGbHwnTBVjTIUl13r7yvVoK42HBiFCI4USfXDvvbWnfgGCuX7uHlIKcELK1CoD5FfJOh8AUadgQedkJqBn9o9_NRAQ61WUCUJvb3RXiQ=w955-h637-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/q_g50qDxZc44lDGU9jaPMD4dJNm16gS6beKPOJ6Ts7S4fgw2ArVDDDAU0cL4aHgchGQuolwNOzbxB8oCCnYuvzieHfw-T8A0vy1RxELsGC04EU572n99NbcrgQzcVu-1VsxG1mIpCfveVJNnc6HgmwVRm6MvuJMuFSw5iTJG4bxxahCF0XaqcbMII7uwtIDh-UVJz81ImS4aaNVb-W8jKt7xY_7PynCrdskqyTjQh5oaN8uK-XHJ9bEejZEPFp4L0Db8vc2eIOLNnZEBRHpiCUJoJ5vVxFOG1TZT4nuTe5Mo6RGL2YRpueXmpWnkGwJpvU6gVG3FeOK1Z1R6N6SRdtGI2H-St4dZ97JKra7_n6BxwMBq8oWhrxJy-eSHeUpbOv_hZt9j_IPLyVXwLXJFidnEpXaKBu_822yMrvD0qtFINiMNva3HKxaWfLrNmNSJHW6_ZpiRKN3k_RVcRUfxSca-5NEMwESVyNcSJzx53q3mK-8K3FrqYv3rYfuUiJHTvivHjWYRfbh7dFTfRnGTlxh2XBmF2rVLqUnj-ANmv2fn3ulzm575Lm0uEiAefytPVY2VQAjKPTCOKqlQvAK55WH3MumKbTZAsSPlnQaFgANqMFYrVHOVwQmUBP7AXIjfk3A2iy7Oz65AZBddpVj2Pm7D87ubp5yh-g=w953-h637-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/0b6eqrit_hHib-QC22yoIfLimyB94Nii8P-ghKO8EPC83eMmYJH45BMkr4tGva9WCgAZcYoaCYXGMd9j0ArfJpam161-KnLeFK4nQKFBx6-rBEZEw47tc2M6FrqK4bsXw-xrwfE51kKq36QbHl48-ERtdk-g5Gj8FcfUKsdptwKG8pADP3Oj0_IwwD-4hX5WDwKAAaE0hYYvaeP3tE5Z03raa4STio-U0YSU0e5bmCGJfq3JwBcBaKPL0ARB4MxFBm_OGp1fzVdIsc7LlU2MlOg3rD9toMuwqV0ynQfyHc6Fqg2YPodMQhBmlGv12wLiXXuSZW6ukOQ9HOppCc_S390jsNMFYyzn5bMfOIGyN8A-q-DgiJxcsR6wpBhBI8idbKu9BVL3if5HJlOJKt2LI_Sp5UuPu-Hzg9O613nswLQR0_rOiqBTLmjYUbs3q8aKXo8MZogEaL6wkUsgGcUmgZNgbsULwnMsHG7ylupvJ1Z-LpPcN9WL6yUaJfhg6BEFJExJxi_TszS7jfGY9c_R9edVKlM8yJDEDRowGKiYBEJSylk39UjA6NnE9Jf0hMCJAyrsMSxAkevt9AIcXfwQtumesO3ub87ifhQZl-Rcecad3n6QkxjZilS3hZstUJ0dF_0oBF_fktQoP8tYA3q2zmTQB7GDTyg6QQ=w953-h637-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 20 March, 2018, 02:25:14 pm

Hi Scott,

Don't know about the good old Sidchrome spanners, but you would be hard pressed to get better quality than the set of Royal Richards, as they were known in my youth.

I'm tipping the bent ones are for the fuel pipes and delivery valves on an early diesel. Just my guess.
Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 20 March, 2018, 04:43:14 pm
Bent ones are a type of "pipe" spanner of some sort.

Out with the electrolysis tank, nice chance to use your new dog wash tank
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 20 March, 2018, 06:52:07 pm
Scott, the odd bent ones are for the Grey Ferguson diesels, used on the injector pipe nuts and the fuel filter.

They are very, very sought after. Their current value is a little bit over the equivalent weight in gold.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 20 March, 2018, 08:39:39 pm
Scott, the odd bent ones are for the Grey Ferguson diesels, used on the injector pipe nuts and the fuel filter.

They are very, very sought after. Their current value is a little bit over the equivalent weight in gold.
So we don't make a sculpture out of them like Ian posted then?
It makes sense that there are 2 of them. There were 2 plowed depth spanners/ gauges. Possibly 2 Ferguson tractors?
Cheers Scott
PS: how much is gold worth now-a-days? I might have to sell them to pay for some projects that are on the go.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: tractorfan on 21 March, 2018, 02:58:09 pm
Quote
So we don't make a sculpture out of them like Ian posted then?
It makes sense that there are 2 of them. There were 2 plowed depth spanners/ gauges. Possibly 2 Ferguson tractors?
Cheers Scott
PS: how much is gold worth now-a-days? I might have to sell them to pay for some projects that are on the go.

Perhaps the gold reference was a bit of an exaggeration, however, I did sell one on eBay for $140 a few years ago.

A bit more info:

http://ozwrenches.com/ferguson.htm (http://ozwrenches.com/ferguson.htm)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 21 March, 2018, 04:02:51 pm
WOW Scotty, that will top up the super annuation fund!

Sounds like you did find GOLD in general Scotty. Not just the Whitworth stuff but the tractor spanners too. Well done.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 21 March, 2018, 05:30:25 pm
I did sell one on eBay for $140 a few years ago.

A bit more info:

http://ozwrenches.com/ferguson.htm (http://ozwrenches.com/ferguson.htm)
Cheers. Thank for that Mr fan.
I did look at that site to find out about them after you mentioned the Fergy thingo.
I'll clean them up and see what size they are. Maybe, just maybe one is the size Ozyspanners is looking for. 
One I'll keep just because I want to. The neighbour has a diesel Fergy. I'll have to ask him if he has one of these spanners ;)

Cheers Scott
PS: No doggy dip yet Cobba. I need to make a frame for it before it can get bubbling.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 April, 2018, 07:05:57 pm
Home made drill pres
I think this has been up somewhere before
Can't restore it as then it would look new so just going to give it a clean up
Anyhow just noticed a feature on it you can put the handle where ever you want it WHY ?
Also look how the wooden handle is fitted
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 17 April, 2018, 07:24:49 pm
Looks like a 2 speed ratchet drill ?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 April, 2018, 07:38:15 pm
Hi Kim There is six slots to put the handle where you want it
2 speed can't see how unless there is something missing will have look in the morning
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 18 April, 2018, 12:07:50 am
A lot in common with these ?


http://oldtoolheaven.com/breast_drills/breast_drill3.htm
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 April, 2018, 07:12:00 am
Hello Ian.
It is a 2 speed ratcheting drill.
The pin has a taper on the bottom like a Lister crank handle. If you pull the pin (if it's not stuck) you can rotate it and it will slip it into the 4 various positions (you can see that in your picture). In one position it's continuous (is that the term for locked up). in the next position it'll ratchet one way then locked up then ratchet the other way as yu turn the pin around to it's various locations.
For the 2 speed you twist the collar between the 2 gears on the main spindle. Twist it one way the top drive gear works with the inner gear on the handle, twist the other way the outer gear on the handle drives the lower gear on the spindle giving the two speeds.
If I could find my camera I'd take some pictures to show the bits on a drill pulled apart.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 April, 2018, 07:35:54 am
Found it.

Other side of the ratcheting pin

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/1HkSEH385JIDy_fckAAb5SBYCFr-abBManu435RvKIXxC573s8eDpMcd8D1mJYV82boZ42ih75egvCMsNWAia1KiOvlY_yHCZ7lUXCPxqm7DW8JYgaxFL3Tsx6GzTZK-j2NmW_RwPAEly2oYWWJwmSkGZ5OhdVlazh-JldmkRxJIZyaEoeXC-oZK1phHAlCvUFsBQYPlV5AR9lAJbtAom9NqOmzG_92pVu16qV_gccGqB2f19JRSqHf-aMW-eIEaU2bZRdd6vDcnUHIEt1HHf3ysQpLNtm388nhAJLAwOiXrUn2vL2DvIbXlHwJWmQflggIBMwLOfmtz6cu73BGaeitkpRtkD678F7WJsiPDkqDUG6p7g7qoTLS57xWd8-D-aURBe1RiqtSankVRiDn5zXXb8SkYIaSPCDIgeD04p0foQvyypIyQyyTHtLn4Y9daW2coaazoRuA4N_qn9bOxPHpoCKdc_XssgpUtNibMlvC8bqEqgMFKxjFgc6OMDZE4XDVeS3HqLO_DjCcfm_eAuvR-BzFjE9XKIEGs7vKMUAtiVvXm71ezkOTybnCgVR7KN9pK46NuA96M3ohP6jpvdrSSCVX5HQ6r2Rdp_keKAzi0IEu9_zDrjDdQlaReq_RPdrxHODdePcFdKr0_5TpzpmtAP3kVB6wPRg=w885-h588-no)

Pin showing the locking bit

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/RSIaZ32JD72hkR3QREl7qq0w8UiGHjYcGv8_EvOSK1rKrq1UAkefkzTmlgflk2ED_7iCCWyAfDVO3sJNEUPzZ6ovQUVuqI9IKYrqJoZlDVBjy9PJiPZ2rmIu7Zt--TlNi99kTofdfiZcdlbR9kfnK4rI54P5PhLp-eyE7TKClNOeUaxB_DL7CYu7mddGIIb10iVsXFVSdxDE8irrMqUP1ebZq3bpMt8guxj2HjWkmvDojxH1x2s7bfSuHsGH0VD3QU9Nv1dkKL79pcEmgYJAkrCS1MxX9_5gimJRzzwZr008LGoTfvKCOT6euSlXgjoUiISNmA_rgatUkfhkO8urFl9NF9N0hvgK6KB-X0DwAzgyH9vvLQmUEpuHZPKvMcznuifeeyxuN1CWkcYsOCaMNnNhgqAKW9PN3LVMaBbBfOQqwY_zPoHFC0QJTLYPlGZLrmAFZR_TehW-c_NneWOvh4rq-IN4_2a07UqeipnuXuCUjUGmZh8z574tgSGn1TSMB-Jgp5sRaC4Zlb__9Bs3kNBIUvuHCz_YqM_sRqYgi715PWSojNmDKNjFpNJpU-dRPVmT5FK2-4bgqVImgL_iZBbCegOaYLzsR10T4Fo6h1cojSd9WpCe34UDeo5fsKidAU6povsl3Zz2NNnnT3XdGI5quzgXYESM6g=w784-h588-no)

Twisty collar on the spindle to engage either of the gears to allow 2 speeds.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/At9wkVyhG-mokQPUsrNjladPX6CSoca3RRMSybMOUQZPBBYcLwxq07lM16vDyfWZnTl37LODFcR6EuafXVsh4B_BtHvo44Y3pufulZvxCUfM3ohE1agJiuWo1mz04JzlA2BgCj9btTyWKSfEtZ8dneh9RXoPmcJTSuAqCoOEDEFi2iRKLvInyfxpjImi_NGaodx1aP6S6L90zwqjsHiOwqOv3l074LeuS9oQJ6-WZ0-JEspTdoJxdDliNcrf_RkVkumXkTUx1GJbUe0yGhZYtf-oL--iRUZ-i_2nqDhqaL7y89exphCTbEYG_Gd7z6yErbjfd0KKC5rz1kcZBSxYOn5lTo4LRz900JiXu0QpP0oCiWKVlUmWXXteGs4ENsKDQpk8v8DazXy-cH0zBKR9T5FwxiNVRRxj7nB596HwnIVeofkYuE84L50GVOHoF5FYZr6sHr5m6A_eLCrYUE_6KtqD0K-47Y6rT9B-jeQvJ2g4_SKlvDuFTwoW7oTgI4irb6bqm6UPVetpV7PRa4Y6BT4OEYr5Er6SX0up3q0VxsDnDEG02qUzh62D-VgyGyEDKDbGCUCh6yu8x4N_xyVyX4IWFLsjbgqFZKNt__E0l4Vt5fx_1mMy6M3UTmsMFmmDX-h_FOiLKcT-ELqFN7qsWMYLB9IK27rtLA=w392-h588-no)

The funny shaped handle simply allows a lot of flexibility to be able to use the drill in tight spots I suppose.

Ours also has a detent spring and ball to keep pressure between the drive and driven gears. You can see it towards the top in the last picture.

They would have been a pretty flash drill in their day.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 April, 2018, 08:05:44 am
Hello again
Believe it or not but I've been looking for the camera for a few days. Believe it or not, one of my pet hates is looking for stuff....especially tools. Even scratching around in a toolbox like an old chook annoys the begeesus out of me.
So with tools in mind I've never forgotten my Pop's tool roll he had in the back of Nan and Pop's Austin Lancer and if anything needed fixing he'd go out and get his tool roll from the boot, unroll it and fix what-ever was broken. The stuff he had in that tool roll.
Simple childhood memories. Sadly I have no idea where that tool roll is now. Probably sold in a garage sale by my Aunty from hell.
We've been finding a few tools around the place and we've also been collecting a few sewing machines. So instead of chucking all the tools in a box and thinking what better way is there to a test sewing machine after it's been fixed, I thought I'd make some tool rolls. Some rolls will be simply put in a big wooden box and some will be used.

Cheers then
Scott

Here is some drill bits kept together within a roll. They'll go in the big wooden box.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/VCbo9U_fN2rgM_roXVvu3KqyUhwMrErafT5Gd-0V2Se7VZgzVqR5GeCgLHjlMROsbMt-Pj0ohQbuexpK4s3LG84bvz3AH3j4iUBfqWtK8sIcvkgrWr_AVfINOxM0lmtxA3tQVOcLI72SbZVmBm6L9h1VVzV4BXEX4TZc3v0oOfJVNNPlLSTH_7XS0L7dejgi2yyEffFF2e5aTamH0WrYQUxZvQ0WTopbBrhIHVOdd5TabulA-0F5Dy3mGuxVySoKcUYl4SCDSf2UVXVxaQhjN9d_I_etD_7KxWowsiWT_ZtBdx5oflCdDSmb5sASTDIwiYvyuw05sIwY__Q7a5jJWHn7J9mLZCr7CbGSqOS9qFz8hUvvGspPT7bfou982cgDZwgy28ywkDaWQZbwv5iiAzBx5utdU7ZPwuT2KXyKdHW8A3ercvfgovAuvZXezomcKnLMavYtbJXdnBRlZxDCmxAO3WDiZm9HsVTz_zE_BaHuHxjMpy9gLv6UmUeHueD63aHRhphGXXGY50rWuJenjxi9Xt07aKUX_DthLnSR0RRRsu5FpVufmFttVoj0lAAo23TpnkxoqSdM4cQKRmLi802Z8XQWej4iwVrhHWzvdlgOPavRFryDsXFxd2e_tQnlSsf45Ku4yf3Ir7Bf6XiVPRuCKW30gvUGZQ=w499-h375-no)

Some hook picks which will be in my toolbox.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/XpxJdBiZweKvBQDNia3ChJ_P-Ek70k1IiGuA3I-nVOi8SxjJurymVuMcvDzESv8vrSQGDknCv7LYW6gyte6emLRcnfbe6vj4DZhdLj6opOaOIagGeN5IuiK3uwsQUIDUZakpu4SybpN6pSGM4trkepP1H1JMAZ1yZ2yhBTkdgrKbVZtkiukhBRRwtU2zW3lm8tcUrWvyrvKhUFaB8FeGv6XEtK73HkFEbDDbeXrHll4tDGoGNAHnvMMPayAXpjzggJ6YcDYIc-VUorqcpUOeOXmFLAMSnntPw4NHy-OT6PFwwdgQm31j-_11hW9eWT33BVksKcvslH5tmWDbesSxbcoeZyHO1VCPUSdNOC5Y1kM9E-4ritVA3fIVb1DG_adQYyQ83ROkYgLW3rn5w9T1iTeJ5uwGcG4M64fe3xUWCypGj6UKPA_tX_JkPT-5R0Q1u5QjiGkem-JXkL9A5PteE0ZJUZyUNuZ_jOoEPoN6tIOok7OnsxDY9LNHHJBeZRowoK8GUbdtm9Y_ZIMJVcYpyAwADwkdBtjswLkMajf0H_RWNzm16uZO_kE_yVpI5prZWcv3_wJd8PHVDA577XHpaZIBk7bS4zPSHCXVPCMTf4Nt39IsgCncag1Gx3NMyRqNn3BSlmx8dPDvtBMRhYIh_byPkjkyZMuytQ=w881-h588-no)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-v0VQW8Ndj8RZoi2KUcH7IOsPHqZYFqyhuL1d3NzoAEinIc6NaKa3cBHH35_f0luK_7hHD4rQiuQJ3c2vQSiLLDIIh4Fl3sMfZsvQQIQRTKOUHsYrE6ahV_Mg4qbcv1NyEQQwtblcDfDlg_kkJ-MsRfZOzIVuvzE1zglJcHz7iL_8dlTo9KLo4_VXkx2FLItjrvYPwi9RRZTp3rOrWh1j4O9Ipl9D3O8MXbawuY5xwaVAx4zsmwAvT4e-j0xhmg9Ud3KVt_ei82IwEgRSL1n6SN_etgTjN3na1tfghVZfBCtquqZk2Dmbt9ftvDfF94UAhU-HqnCm5SSD1J2GzVXxq-bGU9RWXnyDd6BUcDG2IJ-u7Ag6SIfn9Du3kG17OoSNXZHGS1bZH_aLOIiRFZE-WB3ACfHAfvXeCpxwFygVU59MHhgY4S2VsgThhcIRfmqDwv-pZhHUY_lOCtiwxbrY8TtJRVGJVUhRqZFpLefFnBzFv7HIG68SOykCufUmOJc8FSVLGOJU4xnnLP2_lU0Kdo9LA7BXm_8520MY5QNBVnnLAzfHDUB2QdT9c5qMvPI_IKvEMEHoDVU8onyJ8pWedxdXWi55EbT7MVWxxN9KbQa9n2ftqjOKr5C4mKkhYhCsf03DuviPd2AkhREqP70ALux-1KkP_oQdQ=w392-h588-no)

And some magneto tools which will also be in my toolbox. Notice the spare spot? That where the little set of spanners should be. I just can't find the bloody things to put them in there.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fWYl7ShJ4JC_-0leg3Vh5K904Ot0QryXMaNBMyiu7X7wF4ynI3pWmoBjeQ_gVFH9sI6_tQ39OBHT-guDVeduL6H0sRMFMuwLvjQzpj6oGYN1DMoksrm49lcYLtCUGN7-hFi7ub5eeOumRvbWLn7t1HqXmQmoVGx-FUpQdsV7UYi7ANzRPtUcQmoQXGtbegZlMkfJVAS-7bwsVCvmmxM97V-xyq3F5Xv89v_kWuIH3Yx_ckFGB7ef3rahurAfYz7834-JbLoQa9IZErPOx6Kr-FPlPSkfXYRppPnHzM0kANUjMR17FJ2kamg6ymFQ1XfUVq0I0hk4JUpbuqN5lexthtag3X5zChVtt6PN4FnBQtvfDSkbPQ54UVt9yxmIJItJwbvgiHeVkGWEJjL4zA4YDeQuFYmW78QgZCQ54phHyqv1M4CNqJ8fjIuLYrDH4CnSsl8FJIe_L_yq80eqoO63Xhw0r6gDY_9CsdRYimPe1kkb2xGmozZXvd8__i5LTJGARfswP_GIyrYcLDQrUFylUVO2wj2YlOBuTMQdLKGjR2zzcGM_fk7hWWHjedsPLcNX3HKPPMwDwZB6GBDe1Q43D1JPFEDK4kXzhaXb8sTxfnrvCzU0J0zMCTjJb6vMaYFZpjvgqjoC_TVS1kFl1EGC8XU_v46KiFftkQ=w784-h588-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: klanger on 18 April, 2018, 01:10:16 pm
Hi Scott, maybe you can sell these at the next engine rally, along side the bouncy castle ;) ::)

All kidding aside, great work.
I had my grandfathers tool roll from his very early 60's Dastun Bluebird.
Lost to the mists of time now.

Kev.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 18 April, 2018, 02:45:59 pm
Dee just spotted your sewing exercise and now wants to send some fabric up to you and you can nock up some curtains to help her get in front of the orders.

Nice work seamstress!
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 April, 2018, 02:59:02 pm
Thanks Scott
What is wrong with mine in the bit between the 2 bevel gears is stuck
Still unique how it is mad into a drill press
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 April, 2018, 03:37:23 pm
Dee just spotted your sewing exercise and now wants to send some fabric up to you and you can nock up some curtains to help her get in front of the orders.
I'm good on curtains. I made them for the caravan and I made a shade sail for out the back. I'm liking this sewing and knitting thing.

Our drill was stuck too Ian. In one of the pictures you might be able to see where someone ground off the inner set of teeth on the flywheel thingo. I've got the 2 speed selector working hoping I'll find another flywheel thingo one-day.
Yep, your drill press is certainly unique Ian. I'd just tidy it up a bit too.
They chose the right drill to convert to a drill press. with the mounting.

Cheers Scott
PS: Seamstress. I don't seem stressed. How could I be stressed. Good cook, good place to live, a few animals and a hobby. What's to stress about?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 April, 2018, 10:03:06 am
Push Bike puncture repair kit
Does anybody remember these
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 20 April, 2018, 01:18:03 pm
Yep. I still have the push bike sized clamp somewhere.

 I also have the car sized clamp. A few years ago I wanted to repair a couple of tubes for the 26 Chev. I discovered to my surprise that the 5 minute vulcanizer patches patches were still available  and ordered a tin. I was surprised also (don't know why) to find they were made in China. I was further surprised to find that, whatever I tried, including soaking the heat source in methylated spirits and heating it with a propane torch, it was impossible to ignite it to provide the heat needed to vulcanize the patch onto the tube.

I wonder if this is a Health and Safety issue? :) I suppose the user, no matter how ham handed and lacking in safety awareness he is, would find it difficult to burn himself using the patches straight from the tin as intended, if the heating compound will not burn. The patches don't stick very well without the heat though!

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 20 April, 2018, 02:40:36 pm
I'm sure if I looked hard enough I too will find one of those clamps somewhere safe!
As for vulcanising patches give me chemically bonded ones anytime.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 April, 2018, 10:59:46 am
What was this used for ?
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 22 April, 2018, 11:14:56 am
PMG telephone line strainer.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 22 April, 2018, 11:31:51 am
I was going to suggest a wire strainer but I did not think of telephone cables.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 April, 2018, 05:42:17 pm
Hello Ian.
I have actually used a set of those 30 feet in the air tensioning power lines. These were used for either telephone or railway or electrical overhead cables. Not the multicored insulated stuff, the twisted copper uninsulated overhead lines.
Do they have serrations inside the jaws or just plain? They came in different sizes as well and somewhere I seem to remember the ones for copper lines were plain and the ones for steel had the serrations in the jaws. But that was over 35 years ago.

Cheers Scott

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 22 April, 2018, 05:42:50 pm
"PMG telephone line strainer."
Oh how may of them would there be out there
What age?
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 April, 2018, 06:12:57 pm
"PMG telephone line strainer."
Oh how may of them would there be out there
What age?
Ian
There would be more then you think Ian.
I started my apprenticeship in the early 80's. Some of the line trucks still had them on board. Don't know if it was laziness or they still used them. Assume laziness.
I'm just trying to think..... These were used before the time what we called dead-ends were used when you terminate the overhead wires. Dead ends are those preformed bits of bent wire that wrap around an insulator and hold the tension in the wire. Not the intermediate insulating pins, I mean terminating the wire on the discs or bobbins.
It's all coming back to me. These suckers with the leather strap were not used to create a lot of tension. Only low tension. There were other grabs used for high tensions and we even used rope tied onto the wire in a special way as to not distort/bend the cable instead of grabs.
Similar items to what you've shown are still used today for twisted services or bundled conductors which only require low tensions.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 April, 2018, 06:14:42 pm
I forgot to add. Who can guess how we were taught to check the tension in new overhead power lines? This will surprise a lot of people I'd say.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 22 April, 2018, 07:34:39 pm
"PMG telephone line strainer."
Oh how may of them would there be out there
What age?
Ian

Were used for as long as the PMG was in operation, about 70 years. Image from the post masters general instruction manual. 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 22 April, 2018, 08:47:55 pm
Show that picture to an old liney and they'll ask....what the hell are they doing?
You don't tension at pins. You only tension at shackles or discs because that's where the tension is held ie either end. Pins only hold the wire off the crossarm. Pins do not hold any wire tension what-so-ever.
It's like tensioning a barb wire fence. Where do you put the strainers and do the straining? At the strainer posts or in the middle of the fence line?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 23 April, 2018, 02:01:35 pm
I thought you had to hang off the wire to see if you hit the ground. If you hit the ground 2 things have happened. Wire not tight enough and your a gonner.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 14 May, 2018, 10:49:02 am
Six Tools in one
Both of these have six tools in but do different operations has anybody seen one
Also Buzacott combination tool
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 June, 2018, 03:47:40 pm
Simplex
Would you call it a winch ?
Would be used for raising something that would not be to heavy
I wounder what application it was used for
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 June, 2018, 05:27:53 pm
Hello Ian
I reckon the winch is to raise the tail (knock it out of gear so to speak) on a Simplex windmill.

Cobba has pictures of one of those 6 in one machines. Our local museum has one too. I'm not sure what make or model.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: steeleye on 02 June, 2018, 11:22:59 am
I forgot to add. Who can guess how we were taught to check the tension in new overhead power lines? This will surprise a lot of people I'd say.

Cheers Scott         Pluck it. Hear what note it played?????
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 02 June, 2018, 02:58:42 pm
Now I have something I don't know what it is!

I must ask, What is a 6 in 1 machine?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 02 June, 2018, 04:30:41 pm
Now I have something I don't know what it is!

I must ask, What is a 6 in 1 machine?
Oh Cobba. Pictures....you posted pictures of a six in one machine. You found it on your Tassie holiday. Remember this? You posted it in reply number 188 (page 13). It's what Ian has posted an ad for.

Cheers Scott

(https://forums.tomm.com.au/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4504.0;attach=13344;image)

(https://forums.tomm.com.au/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4504.0;attach=15193;image)

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 03 June, 2018, 02:31:15 pm
Now I do, but that was over 12 months ago now Scotty.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 09 June, 2018, 03:25:00 pm
Picked this up today
Thread cleaning tool 6 sizes anybody seen one like this before
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 09 June, 2018, 04:08:11 pm
I take it that to get the 6 different sizes that the TPI are the same only the diameter is different. What a neat little tool
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 09 June, 2018, 05:46:49 pm
Hi John
The TPI is different for each size
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 09 June, 2018, 05:54:23 pm
Hi John Trying to type and think at the same time
The TPI is the same
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 10 June, 2018, 09:07:03 am
Hi Ian,
With the TPI being the same for all diameters, what are the chances of it being BSF?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 10 June, 2018, 11:50:37 am
Hi Ian,
With the TPI being the same for all diameters, what are the chances of it being BSF?

Don't think so. I have a set of BSF taps and dies from 1/4" to 1/2", and the TPI is different for each size. If they are 26 TPI they could be either BSB or BSC ( brass or cycle) threads, if they are 32 or 40 TPI they could be ME series 32 or 40 threads, but they might also not comply with any modern standard.

I have seen a few old screw plates which cut completely non standard threads. This one is interesting in having removable dies - I suppose it would be called a die plate??? Most of the ones I have seen had the thread cutting (or forming) holes as part of the tool steel screw plate. I think in some trades like gunsmiths they survived until relatively recent times.

Frank.

A bit of history here:
https://www.theexplora.com/the-screw-plate-cutting-sizing-thread-pre-whitworth-standard-of-1841/
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 10 June, 2018, 05:25:48 pm
If they are 26 TPI they could be either BSB or BSC ( brass or cycle) threads
BSB would be interesting.  :)

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 10 June, 2018, 05:31:25 pm
Hi Frank
The pitch is the same on the die thickness 8 threads on all of them
Which makes it interesting as to what thread it is
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 10 June, 2018, 05:34:48 pm
Hi Scott YES I would say Brass thread
Ian
https://britishfasteners.com/threads/bsb.html
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 11 June, 2018, 11:20:00 am
I just went back and look at what diameter they would fit and it appears to have 3 different diameter dies. If it is BSB I then wonder what trade it would have been used in.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 11 June, 2018, 11:46:24 am
I'm a little surprised no one knows what this is? .....blacksmith die used in conjunction with tapered taps for the pre standardized  old style custom made fasteners.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 June, 2018, 03:45:24 pm
The die is not tapered and when you work out the thread per inch it is 26 TPI which is a Brass thread
Mine is made in the UK you can just see it
What you have shown is a 'tap holder and 3 sizes' for the different size tapered taps
Not the tool I have
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 11 June, 2018, 03:50:30 pm

John,
BSB threads were used a lot in the electrical trade in as much as brass conduit in light fittings and the like. I believe they were also used in scientific instruments. BIDSTBC.
Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 11 June, 2018, 05:25:00 pm
BSB threads were used a lot in the electrical trade in as much as brass conduit in light fittings and the like.
Hello Cobba
Just to expand on what Steve has said, BSB came about because brass pipe usually has a lot thinner wall then steel pipe, hence, the depth of the cut thread on bigger sized brass pipe (ie 1") would virtually cut through the brass pipe. ie the minor diameter of the thread would be smaller then the inside diameter of the pipe. Having 26 TPI for all diameters of brass pipe solved the problem of too deep a thread. 26 tpi has a thread depth of about 0.025 of an inch, so quite shallow.
Make sense? Gees I hope someone can explain it better if it doesn't.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 11 June, 2018, 06:34:42 pm
The dies are not tapered only the taps and it is a blacksmith die, more than one maker made them and I don't see the TPI being relevant in regards to the tool, what is relevant is the way the tool is used, there were many different manufacturers of these.


 http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-and-history/holroyd-j-m-king-waterford-ny-screw-plates-tap-dies-315797/
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 June, 2018, 06:56:10 pm
Great Kim you found a picture

In your ad that is a tap wrench used many of them in my day
I don't know why you keep say 'Blacksmith' ??
NO not a Blacksmith's die could they have them yes, but more likely a F & T
Your ad also says 'Machinist & Steam fitters' now that's where I fit in
TPI is relevant, very much so on which job it is 
Yes of course one item was made by different manufactures  nothing new in that 
There is lot of different 'thread chasers' out there not used by blacksmiths But fitter & turners
Looks like we are touching the "expert" subject
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 11 June, 2018, 06:58:13 pm
What you have shown is a 'tap holder and 3 sizes' for the different size tapered taps
Not the tool I have
Ian

No, it is a blacksmith die tool and taper taps. 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 June, 2018, 07:28:50 pm
Hi Kim please read your ad
I don't why you think that it is ONLY a blacksmith's tool sorry you are wrong
He we go I'm an expert
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 11 June, 2018, 07:36:12 pm
Well that's what they have been sold as and called for the last 180 years, BTW your not the only machinist on the forum, possibly a 'expert' though?, if you are a expert why ask what it is? perhaps you don't understand how 'exactly' they are used ?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 June, 2018, 09:50:28 pm
Hahaha your funny 180years hahahah By by this thread has been undermined   
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 07:01:45 am
Hello Ian
Would the sizes for the pipe be 1/4, 3/8, 1/2" and 5/8ths of an inch?
I see sizes are on the opposite to where the die numbers are.

I'm going to throw my hat into the ring and say that particular tool is known as a stock and die.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 07:27:08 am
Hello again.
I'm not even going to ask where you got those ads from Kim because you simply won't.
I'll even venture further to suggest the tool Ian has found can be referred to as a machinists', gunsmiths' and amateurs' screw plate as well as a good old plain stock and dies as I just mentioned.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 12 June, 2018, 08:11:34 am
Blacksmith stock , dies and taps...... ::)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 08:41:41 am
Hello all
How could I predict you would not reference where you got those ads from Kim?

I don't agree the tool Ian has posted to be a Blacksmith die as suggested in post number 277.
One reason would have to be....why would a blacksmith want brass threads?
From my limited knowledge, isn't the die the threading bit, the stock is the thing that holds the die? Even then I do not agree the term 'blacksmith' has anything to do in the naming of this particular tool.

One thing you have to remember Kim is just because you say so doesn't mean it is.
In this case I believe you to be wrong. Most people would gracious to accept that they were wrong and be grateful that they have learnt something contradictory to what they believed to be true. But not you. What's the word for that?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 June, 2018, 08:44:49 am
No Kim wrong again, here is some more from my oldest catalogue
Sorry it is only 125 years old not 180 ,don't see blacksmith mentioned
Ian 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 12 June, 2018, 09:12:46 am
No, Blacksmiths stocks and dies........ ;)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 09:35:23 am
No, Blacksmiths stocks and dies........ ;)
Do you keep saying that because you want to argue like a troll and cannot find any evidence that supports that the item Ian posted is a Blacksmiths' stock and dies other then the picture you've posted? The item in the ad you've posted looks nothing like Ian's tool. For a starter it has 2 long handles.
I agree with Ian. Your wrong. Not just wrong but very wrong in describing that tool Ian posted as a Blacksmiths' stocks and die.
This ad is from an Australian catalog put out by the Lassetter firm who was based in Sydney.

As a side note Ian. How big is that stock physically?
Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/QS8YuriVuyiT7iqxWtSE0PPPd5boJNH-lJieAd4lEXEW9gj5OFdKq2bKA2r2cpCUYScBlAuRUI3xCZs9rPWqT5uBhpD_JzU8Hxy9lPfEzKREy-BQZlh1OrgAEYI7IsZoodJvDKj1p2sO8CMeDGumC-L24tBBVCbz3IjU80UPNmiDps0nuJJUSFEWm7vqSl_IbtBjr7PNKlCEMhjSHjmj-m9WtaB-LyXac5rAjbA8OObpxh5s3pusHA8_r-0onuzJzdUJwFXepVNORLD4LK4p3vWWHBQ_NHjq2aV7cso0_Mqnph2QmROogUY0F81GF9uhvCZJOs8U0gpeqUpG241RpSxXxy4v51WmBuMH5INDjDhqWX8sdsPkmE64DTGVGsAIy6J8GowgiV0ohM6cfSp0rZDFfjrCVgSAN0rd4EMibJicQvox3SeBgxdL5xPUHWFJ6BuCKlb-ZOSALgAUU0MfckQ4-FIDMoo0BoCjlwhfWEUARXJwc1zVRU6FPw-oV8w2XXFQVE1P6mVae8D5epY2-Rs6RYBdOe9anW7f9JTxCjc1cLAwpN1wOdCCKV9z6rqWcgUsWX_2GjFAqu6Dq_AxmynlMUGTndeX9ekepFIyBXshrdd9DPICeCQmNZth-yw8siTC_3P8_GnZKtGZp4nYuZraBGJ1tUbEwA=w902-h601-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 12 June, 2018, 09:39:10 am
Here you go Scott.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 09:58:53 am
Hello Kim.
I don't know if you've realised or not, but the picture you just posted is of a threading tap. No only that, when you look at the sizes, there is no 26 TPI. That does not support your theory of Ian's tool been a Blacksmiths' anything.
What was the point in posting that picture at all. It's a tap and there's no 26 TPI. Ian's tool is a stock and die with only 26 TPI.

In the picture of the Blacksmiths' tap you posted in reply number 277, it is obvious that the tap was on page 142 in a C.A.S. catalog.
In that catalog, what is on page 149? Would be something like this? What? No mention of Blacksmiths' stock and dies?
Actually there is no mention what so ever of Blacksmiths' stock and die in that catalog.
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433066407945;view=1up;seq=184 (https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433066407945;view=1up;seq=184)

Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/HiwsZjEOp09W-NLghID9hvMs54aapvIRnIvmcuv2z6mCHO8H1tczgAJcrb29JAbLUfC7bnXnN4af7gUk0tw6B0G8p7IAPvmA2ioGQnSOGEDUpRQwkb9uo5WwAcOtpkdZ8cy0FnVZWFt5QWo7TnJap3w1MLfQWaXMC5AaSySst3mBpxzR68q1UoxiCTlfCbvjmPdYEBrrrKoSUApXF4CCsG-Lrt3z6cQKsG2a6W1CZ79c6v01qEQ_BeozAjO5I_NtnVnfRwlGRD8IrCCApPdZp6ILEcZ_1h62oSOBl7ZjDnuL-iFDAemyn5Ji9yG4kVAsog3ZpdX4a_Hky0DzMxHxXf4A7LIj-QzLrIN21hs7kCt3DUk1ZCltumtDMq8Dd8dAJyQL_63mEa1cVfpV7laQFBY6JVMUOW1hfdQfy4eStOfgPk1Y8WrnMALaO7xQzqx8fNp1OXYJJhMp4TBfPxRcbvh3Ox8J82p3mECRISev4-_1nb7ypLVKuDghUgy47jrPhQK-vIgyB_CTbRICkkijAB8qOL3jEKGwfflntzbAhAqX7aqRa5AidXRJzYa4WSXrSWocL0UVD6PyERH5rz-6pQY-y5PFdgkqgdYV3kr9ff2XyFYQgQfGk-9ZQIbLWQyI_9y-fn3Ckhrs1YqQzP6HThxg1UonxwBpvA=w736-h543-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 12 June, 2018, 10:13:19 am
What ever you reckon Scott as you are indeed a "expert" as has been observed over the years and well proven, now back to the workshop to sort out my blacksmiths tap and dies and the engineers tap and dies.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 June, 2018, 12:31:06 pm
Kim the link you put up the tool has 2 handles mine does not
Scott the one you put up is a twin to mine and 14 1/2" long
Kim your link does not say 'blacksmith'
**HOLROYD and J M KING Waterford NY Screw Plates Tap & Dies** 
Kim's picture
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 June, 2018, 02:06:03 pm
What ever you reckon Scott as you are indeed a "expert" as has been observed over the years and well proven, now back to the workshop to sort out my blacksmiths tap and dies and the engineers tap and dies.
Hello Kim.
Is that your way of saying.....What a great day. I've learnt something today. I always thought those suckers were Blacksmiths' dies but now I know I was wrong and they're simply a stock and dies. Cheers-thanks for that.?
If so, then your welcome.  ;D

Cheers Scott
 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 12 June, 2018, 03:35:21 pm
Scott the 'tool' expert..........
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 June, 2018, 06:40:41 pm
Does anybody have this book (I do) 96 pages of good info all on vintage tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Mightgo on 13 June, 2018, 04:51:42 pm
Hi what would this be
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 June, 2018, 06:21:33 pm
The same as the one I put but only 4 threads mine is 6
The chap I got it from said a 'thread chaser' and being involved with a trade I agreed
Go back one page
There is disparagement over what the tool is to me it is a tool for any trade to use not just for one trade
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 14 June, 2018, 05:28:13 am
Hi what would this be
Hello Mr Mightgo
You decide.   ;D
Cheers Scott

Option 1:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/QS8YuriVuyiT7iqxWtSE0PPPd5boJNH-lJieAd4lEXEW9gj5OFdKq2bKA2r2cpCUYScBlAuRUI3xCZs9rPWqT5uBhpD_JzU8Hxy9lPfEzKREy-BQZlh1OrgAEYI7IsZoodJvDKj1p2sO8CMeDGumC-L24tBBVCbz3IjU80UPNmiDps0nuJJUSFEWm7vqSl_IbtBjr7PNKlCEMhjSHjmj-m9WtaB-LyXac5rAjbA8OObpxh5s3pusHA8_r-0onuzJzdUJwFXepVNORLD4LK4p3vWWHBQ_NHjq2aV7cso0_Mqnph2QmROogUY0F81GF9uhvCZJOs8U0gpeqUpG241RpSxXxy4v51WmBuMH5INDjDhqWX8sdsPkmE64DTGVGsAIy6J8GowgiV0ohM6cfSp0rZDFfjrCVgSAN0rd4EMibJicQvox3SeBgxdL5xPUHWFJ6BuCKlb-ZOSALgAUU0MfckQ4-FIDMoo0BoCjlwhfWEUARXJwc1zVRU6FPw-oV8w2XXFQVE1P6mVae8D5epY2-Rs6RYBdOe9anW7f9JTxCjc1cLAwpN1wOdCCKV9z6rqWcgUsWX_2GjFAqu6Dq_AxmynlMUGTndeX9ekepFIyBXshrdd9DPICeCQmNZth-yw8siTC_3P8_GnZKtGZp4nYuZraBGJ1tUbEwA=w902-h601-no)

Option 2:

(https://forums.tomm.com.au/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4504.0;attach=15299;image)

Option 3:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/HiwsZjEOp09W-NLghID9hvMs54aapvIRnIvmcuv2z6mCHO8H1tczgAJcrb29JAbLUfC7bnXnN4af7gUk0tw6B0G8p7IAPvmA2ioGQnSOGEDUpRQwkb9uo5WwAcOtpkdZ8cy0FnVZWFt5QWo7TnJap3w1MLfQWaXMC5AaSySst3mBpxzR68q1UoxiCTlfCbvjmPdYEBrrrKoSUApXF4CCsG-Lrt3z6cQKsG2a6W1CZ79c6v01qEQ_BeozAjO5I_NtnVnfRwlGRD8IrCCApPdZp6ILEcZ_1h62oSOBl7ZjDnuL-iFDAemyn5Ji9yG4kVAsog3ZpdX4a_Hky0DzMxHxXf4A7LIj-QzLrIN21hs7kCt3DUk1ZCltumtDMq8Dd8dAJyQL_63mEa1cVfpV7laQFBY6JVMUOW1hfdQfy4eStOfgPk1Y8WrnMALaO7xQzqx8fNp1OXYJJhMp4TBfPxRcbvh3Ox8J82p3mECRISev4-_1nb7ypLVKuDghUgy47jrPhQK-vIgyB_CTbRICkkijAB8qOL3jEKGwfflntzbAhAqX7aqRa5AidXRJzYa4WSXrSWocL0UVD6PyERH5rz-6pQY-y5PFdgkqgdYV3kr9ff2XyFYQgQfGk-9ZQIbLWQyI_9y-fn3Ckhrs1YqQzP6HThxg1UonxwBpvA=w736-h543-no)


Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 14 June, 2018, 02:32:45 pm
Mentioned on here was old style threads
Threads and many other engineering threads tool etc were we sorted out and proven many years ago which we still use today
The oldest book I have is a "Mechanical Engineers Handbook" dated 1916 and the threads shown are no different to what we use today
You will see that the USA thread was also known as the ""Sellers thread" and the metric know as the"French thread"
The number of different types of threads and to mentioned them all and used for what would make this post endless
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 14 June, 2018, 04:15:28 pm
I still shake my head when I think of the engine rebuild done on our David Brown Cropmaster. The big end bolts were BSB thread, 26TPI and fortunately wee-allis helped me out with a couple as I managed to damage one.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: klanger on 15 June, 2018, 08:28:53 am
Looking for any further info about this little hand crank grinder I have.
Was my grandfathers.
All I could find out about it is that it was made by Genko of Germany.


Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 15 July, 2018, 12:36:51 pm
Hi All

Have a stab at this one. I know what it is and who would have used it.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 17 July, 2018, 09:15:29 pm
Hi

So no takers?

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 18 July, 2018, 08:01:56 am
For making cork filters for smokes.
How's that?
Cheers Scott  ;D
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 18 July, 2018, 03:15:40 pm

How about for putting soft copper swages on rope?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 18 July, 2018, 05:40:06 pm
NO No No to you both.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 19 July, 2018, 09:22:00 am
What about breaking fingers of someone you dont like ????
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 19 July, 2018, 10:03:27 am
Small hint "cork"
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 19 July, 2018, 12:38:49 pm
Small hint "cork"
So I'm closer then I realise. Making corks the right size for bottles.
How's that?
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 19 July, 2018, 06:08:55 pm
Hi Scott

That's right, but who would have used it?

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 20 July, 2018, 07:40:01 am
Hello Ia.
Ever been to Stanthorpe? Bottling your own wine is pretty popular, and has been popular since the Italian immigrants first settled the area. I'm sure other immigrants would have bottled similar in other areas.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 20 July, 2018, 08:05:12 am

I'll go for Chemists.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 20 July, 2018, 08:46:20 am
Hi All

Its an Apothecary's Cork Crimper.


Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 20 July, 2018, 10:07:59 am
Its an Apothecary's Cork Crimper.
And it's ornate enough to be on the front counter in a Chemists shop. Good thinking Steve.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: winnock on 20 July, 2018, 09:07:02 pm
This is not quite a tool but can anyone tell me what this Dead Weight Tester would have been used for? When it was given to me I was told it had come from the Victorian Railways diesel workshops. First thought was it would have measured leakage of fuel past injector nozzles or pump plungers. However the space below the weight would not allow these components to have been inserted. The downward movement of the weight is timed.  This I think indicates testing leakage past a valve or plunger. The ADI test number indicates the accuracy of the testing was important. The tester has been fitted to a purpose built hinged box so must have been used in different locations, perhaps on board a locomotive or at different sites.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 21 July, 2018, 08:09:24 am
Hello all
The Borroughs is a red herring I reckon. They made storage stuff didn't they?
I'd be ringing the test mob seeing the phone number and report numbers are there.
I would be interesting to see what it was meant for. Testing rubber hardness?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 21 July, 2018, 04:13:12 pm
The testing of rubber is generally done using a Durometer measuring in the Shaw "A" scale. The same gauge is used for the hardness of polyurethane and some nylon products. The lever on this device looks as if you put the effort into apply pressure to get a result.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: winnock on 25 July, 2018, 03:48:39 pm
Thanks Scott and Cobbadog. No luck with the phone number as it now goes to another business. Don?t hold much hope with the ADI as they are such a large organization and re developed over the years since the test.  Have sent an email off to Borroughs Co.  They did make a lot of specialized tools, as shown by the items that can be found on an EBay search. The lever only lifts the weight so all downward pressure comes from the weight.
Hugh
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 25 July, 2018, 03:58:15 pm
Now I'm wondering if it is a ROC gauge for measuring the hardness of steel. I think the "R" stood for Rockwell test. Saw a smaller thing similar but not the same at a cast iron foundry once a long time back.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 10 August, 2018, 04:19:48 pm
What was this used for? doing leather work ?
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 10 August, 2018, 04:24:20 pm
Quite possible for leather work but more than likely used on carving out soft tiles to be used as a stencil. I remember back to that day when I actually went to school for a look and during the craft lesson we used one of those little bent chisels to carve out the section of tile that we did not want the ink to stick to to make a print of what ever we drew.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 10 August, 2018, 05:30:45 pm
How big is it Ian? I have a set of chisels like that for carving wood. They're about 250mm long. There's also a set of those el-cheepo lino chisels in the draw. They're about 125mm long.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 10 August, 2018, 08:00:26 pm
Hi Scott its 255mm long
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 10 August, 2018, 10:34:11 pm
Hi

My wife's Grandfather was a Pattern Maker my Father In Law had his tool box and there were quite a few gouges simular to the one pictured (various sizes) in amongst his tools.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 August, 2018, 02:54:25 pm
Only picked this up as it has seen military service
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 12 August, 2018, 06:52:32 pm
Got two more from the Cairns swap meet today
A fancy saw tooth setting tool
and pliers a type that I have not seen before
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 12 August, 2018, 08:23:46 pm

Ian, I don't know that the little chisel has necessary seen military service, as my understanding is that the "broad Arrow" symbol indicates that it was Government property and dates back as far as the convict era. If it was mine, I would be doing some research into it. A nice find.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 August, 2018, 08:48:50 am
Hi wee-allis Australia largest military base is a Townsville and during the W2 there was a large USA base here.
Surprisingly there is not much around with the broad arrow on it 
"military service" yes I most likely did not leave the country but sounds good
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 13 August, 2018, 10:36:44 am
Hello all
I thought Defence had the D arrow D while the prison system had the broad arrow.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 August, 2018, 12:21:56 pm
Hi Scott
Yes and no the D D was not always used also other countries used it to
look here
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Frog-Bayonet-SLR-webbing-broad-arrow-Australian-Vietnam-War-era-surplus-obsolete/192624590878?hash=item2cd952001e%3Ag%3ALZgAAOSwrqlZfW4q&_nkw=broad+arrow&rt=nc
also
https://www.ebay.com.au/i/253797651355
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 13 August, 2018, 04:52:56 pm
My understanding of the markings was that it changed over time like the railway stuff did. They had NSWTD and NSWGR, that I know of and possibly more. These changed over time and different Governments. So D.D. and the arrow were quite possibly just a Government mark from different times but my understanding was that DD was department of defense and the arrow was early gaol related.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 August, 2018, 05:39:58 pm
John look at the links in my last post
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Kim S on 03 September, 2018, 08:33:11 am
I believe I know what this is used for ? but will double check, any idea?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 September, 2018, 04:07:04 pm
A very well used sledge hammer
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 11 September, 2018, 04:08:31 pm
Yes a home made tool but for what use
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Oldengines on 11 September, 2018, 06:45:31 pm
Yes a home made tool but for what use
Ian

valve spring compressor
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 11 October, 2018, 08:55:12 pm
Hi

Any idea what this is, is it even a tool?  very heavy.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 October, 2018, 06:50:54 am
Would that be for packing green sand in a mould?
Or is it mum's persuader?  :o
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 12 October, 2018, 03:13:49 pm

Ian, I don't know anything about the tool, but more importantly, where have the Dexters gone?
Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 12 October, 2018, 04:35:22 pm
Look like Nulla Nulla to me
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 12 October, 2018, 04:54:10 pm
Hi Wee-Allis

Dexter's all sold to good homes, got a contract on farm today and looking forward to the next stage in our lives.


Regards


Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 12 October, 2018, 06:31:50 pm

Hi Ian,
It sounds as though things are moving for you in both senses of the word. A big change in life style can be daunting but also exciting. Good luck with the sale and the future.

Just one thing though, make sure where ever you move, make sure there is plenty of room for the toys, sorry investments.

Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 12 October, 2018, 10:36:58 pm
Hi Steve

Starting house hunting tomorrow, Told "She Who Must Be Obeyed" you can pick the house you want as long as it has a big shed or room to build one.


Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 13 October, 2018, 04:02:58 pm
Yeah a shed bigger than the house !

Congratulations and we wish you well moving forward.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 24 October, 2018, 12:12:18 pm
Hi,

Found this tool today, any ideas what it may have been used for.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 24 October, 2018, 04:15:07 pm
Hello Ian.
It's a pair of vice grips. Us them for similar things you use new vice grips for. But these ones would be good for sheet metal.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 24 October, 2018, 06:17:28 pm
Hi Scott

Very short handles so not much leverage also will only close square, the width of the jaws is adjustable.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: winnock on 25 October, 2018, 11:19:28 pm
Could be used for compressing led seals on sealing wire.
Hugh
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 26 October, 2018, 10:24:55 am
Hi

Going to clean it today, so that I can read the name and patent number.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 26 October, 2018, 03:56:42 pm
Found these in a black smiths shop. The wheel looking tool has a handle that is just straight but that got cut off in the pic. I have a good idea what it is for, any takers?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 26 October, 2018, 04:15:36 pm
Yes it is a tool a kitchen tool never seen one like it
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: famous fitter on 26 October, 2018, 05:23:38 pm
Hi Cobba,

The Tool is a measuring wheel that blacksmiths used to measure the difference between the outside of the wooden felloes and the inside of the "tyre" on wagon wheels.
- count the turns on the outside of the built wheel and mark, then do the same on the inside of the tyre and mark and that would tell them how much tension the tyre band has.
I am fortunate that my Grandfather is still building these wheels and have learnt a little bit about the trade.

Cheers Justin
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 27 October, 2018, 10:08:40 am
Could be used for compressing led seals on sealing wire.
Hugh
That may well be the winner. When I worked for the electricity mob we used sealing pliers all the time. They were even numbered so the person who sealed it could be blamed for 'improprieties'. The ones we used were about 120-150 mm long and had interchangeable heads. ....and a lot newer and shinier.
Does your pliers lock like video grips Ian?
I still have brass sealing wire and a bag of deals in the shed. The seals made great splitshot sinkers.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 27 October, 2018, 11:34:07 am
Yep exactly what it is used for. On the ground is the hand operated crimping machine which bends the flat iron into shape. Will post a pic of it later.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 27 October, 2018, 02:44:12 pm
here is the wheel crimping tool.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 27 October, 2018, 03:38:43 pm
Looks more like a tyre shrinker to me.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 28 October, 2018, 10:55:01 am
Looks more like a tyre shrinker to me
Maybe it's another of those regional things Eric? A shifter in the east is a shifter. It's a Crescent in the west apparently.
Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 28 October, 2018, 01:32:00 pm
Scott, it has nothing to do with geography. I was politely stating the correct term. What part of a wheel would you crimp? A Google search will show you what tyre shrinking is.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 28 October, 2018, 01:59:06 pm

That may well be the winner. When I worked for the electricity mob we used sealing pliers all the time. They were even numbered so the person who sealed it could be blamed for 'improprieties'. The ones we used were about 120-150 mm long and had interchangeable heads. ....and a lot newer and shinier.
Does your pliers lock like video grips Ian?
I still have brass sealing wire and a bag of deals in the shed. The seals made great splitshot sinkers.
Cheers Scott
[/quote]

Hi Scott

No they do not lock and the short handles make it hard to put a lot of pressure on the jaws..
I have now given the tool a clean, some of the writing is clear but the name is Double Dutch to me, very faint and hard to read.

SPEET#E  ELECT
MADE IN ENGLAND
BR PAT N0 576142

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 28 October, 2018, 02:26:49 pm


It is an over centre locking adjustable clamp, according to the original patent. The patent number quoted is for the improvements made to the adjuster. Not clever, just Googled the patent number.

Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 15 February, 2019, 09:57:04 pm
Hi All

Three spanners, all the same but different and all stamped Austin.  On a close look you can see that there are small differences in the three spanners.

Any idea what model/models Austin they would belong to.  They all came from different job lots at different clearing sales. Anyone seen any other size spanners stamped Austin?


Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 26 March, 2019, 10:05:44 am
Picked up one more that I have not got
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 29 March, 2019, 10:17:29 pm
Hi All

Had this tool given to me yesterday any know its use?  The late owner was a diesel fitter, worked on the Emu Bay Railway in Tas, then worked on Dozers down the West Coast mines.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 29 March, 2019, 10:22:09 pm
Brake return spring pliers.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 29 March, 2019, 10:56:30 pm
Hi Eric

Thanks for that,

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 30 March, 2019, 07:17:55 am

And a good pair too. You can't buy them like that now.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 30 March, 2019, 01:51:34 pm
Hi All

A very large pipe cutter.  Who would have used a pipe cutter of this size.   Came from the same place has my previous post.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 30 March, 2019, 01:59:58 pm
G'Day Ian, looks like a clay pipe cutter for the old style sewer pipes.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Russell on 30 March, 2019, 04:13:12 pm
Hi Ian
Looks very much like a large exhaust pipe cutter, used for cutting truck exhaust pipe has the same cutters and chain as the new ones I have used
Russell
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 30 March, 2019, 10:03:43 pm
Hi

I think Cobbadog has it right, on close inspection the gaps around the cutters are full of terracotta type debris, not metal.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 31 March, 2019, 03:03:23 pm
WOW, I knew something!
Mainly because of my very early days of earth moving digging trenches for sewr pipes. Plumber had one simialr to yours as he cut pipes to size before fitting bends.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 01 April, 2019, 08:09:41 pm
Hi Rustyengines

Looks like I've just found the twin to your plumbers pliers that you posted in the original post on this thread.  No brand name on mine.

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 30 April, 2019, 05:07:55 pm
Picked up a very rusty tube spanner
What is the second hole fore
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 01 May, 2019, 07:23:04 am
What is the second hole fore
Ian
Hello Ian
Double ended screwdriver?

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 May, 2019, 01:47:24 pm
Ha ha Ha I should of know that  ;D
I have had the other half for sometime and wondered what the handle looks like
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 01 May, 2019, 03:52:16 pm
Oh dear !!!!!        :-X
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 02 June, 2019, 06:10:12 pm
Picked up some more tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 02 June, 2019, 06:11:01 pm
Picked up some more tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 02 June, 2019, 06:12:26 pm
Picked up some more tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 June, 2019, 07:02:52 am
Hello Ian
Some nice tools there. For your set of dividers. I have a set and use them a lot. They originally belonged to my grandfather. He was a wheel wright.

Cheers Scott

(http://www.jonzimmersantiquetools.com/features/no_30.jpg)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 03 June, 2019, 07:07:29 am
Forgot to write.....we have a big brother accompliment (or is it accompaniment?) to the set of plier looking gizmos you posted. I'll get a picture in the next day or so.

Cheers Scott  :)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 06 June, 2019, 06:49:35 am
Forgot to write.....we have a big brother accompliment (or is it accompaniment?) to the set of plier looking gizmos you posted. I'll get a picture in the next day or so.

Cheers Scott  :)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/TzGDkrVNEHsZX8PzdJjl4fjwSWcNCpq3qed55onyQksCkiScB-x9Iad760WHxgbXfn3MsUCBWhZbzCgjCSbXpS83qi5DjudeqUOKB7kb_5dBS98dddencm_odKwF7M7eBncTA2wIeAxhlrOGMV79Yww0GW-8eetx1keRgMArdSDLRDCdlTWJx415nuFvparRgI2B3Y16KJ4GUKVlMMd77x-dv2260xrhO_dfAPnnZgvxiaQQhsRqNWuOhNbQ8w13GYpf2GGNpUX7Pdszl2QZZD3RCByGMreEhjY-w7PDzpg5MLZAQRq31BfelxPTiL1D_MzetNIl8xDuxA0J_FHNeO_Tl5REbgCSUe7bkwK71-B_YkaN2P8s81RlImOciIfr0BZMis4I9Gg26Bhh53AxnBHRqiZNgGQHCx4mR7pmRs8CTo0u4nks5Adx9V6n3C4QZpPn9q3SJ49hsNbfpFsJ9p4QoXSbLxgE7T7PVl2KdURhvCERJs8pvz0Ii5PzHDy2nn3xSWlwvm3S89EHangZhVKjR16LymZ4wv9q5GikIo0OQb1IcsqZqy4Knha0eAxMoVjOwUJhAGwXDbjmsR1z3brk24U1XRinBdzj05xP06B5M4l6IL0ZHOByFxSStFjq2ediJo-W9qIUT2bsmqVBc3DnoLKkj4nRNH7vRXbxTa2voDwI6Y853ePDO7h82FTgw3lOuZFS5LBslAcA0fDPeEIo6Q=w417-h625-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/13nzzCUEGiJNXybhCulJB4KO9ZZhmD0MjCQ72WIeLzDHgATgdGumFrRT6ag3aBFVd3KKd7p2_sG5iz3WR_QE4B9C4aGD4hPCxYpvVi0fXV17m6DdSSem7ykUjNBjaKKr-ghmEwn06y0mQOoBFmlPeqtHOm2N7Nh-nh_LE5J6My9jsYAa4r62zyhkWMimMDRdZFNGZH14gZqSzjzuVsvJPA_dT5Kc6n2VL5miA4Z5Wha5uRVja9VuwnvfM_i3WlToKhwQPSFfz0CjawqLJFSDTPE8stJW1GirL10N1x7zvlp5Tmxrc3oAXnDXJqGGcPyethtY7jsI9gaMh-w7ER-hRD3BJuzoQEHPmtBAIXSP-oXcCgueJuaQ5S7glJft6K25HqXvw_dqIDj8zF3ghELQYEujvWH_yR28HwMXcST4R0Q0_nCcHRAVgZ2GQ8eD_n_KMprZiRNfOCBt2Y0JiPqzn8OGRzQuQR63dtcaqM1vPxUu8sI768XBoTo-0RESJD6qfcaQu3WKrCVn_CV5W0yIjLTxpXV4M2qIw39LOn8GRc3pFo0pOSM3R0S7ZAvd_XzN-u1hmMRTGWY8ALDXXpsLLo-D-3Qo-LcUUhZ8rDE12azeMACQmEH6RUHkzJcNN98hgBNlkYVwQzKy3hdQ_9RVuyiUQi7X9KCC=w211-h316-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 06 June, 2019, 05:14:56 pm
Is this a brake lining riveting tool Scotty?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 06 June, 2019, 07:23:22 pm

Ian,
I'll bite, what are the last pair of special pliers designed for?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 07 June, 2019, 08:36:10 am
Is this a brake lining riveting tool Scotty?
Nope. Not even close Cobba. It's a button press made by Rheubens. Buttons in Australia has a pretty interesting history.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 07 June, 2019, 07:44:10 pm
Hi wee-allis Scott found what they are BUT how do you use them
Ian
From Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 07 June, 2019, 07:46:27 pm
oops sorry about the size this should be better
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 08 June, 2019, 07:14:49 am
Hello all
Heaton buttons were kinda stapled together. You put the button and 'staple' in the pliers and crimped the tab ends over when the pliers closed.
A picture (patent drawing) with button in. From what I know, their buttons were popular in shoes.

(http://www.datamp.org/images/29350-1.jpg)

You can't really tell with Ian's set but they had a spring clip on the pliers to hold the button in position.

(http://www.datamp.org/images/29350-3.jpg)

Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 08 June, 2019, 08:19:45 am

Thanks Scott and Ian. Now I know. Another bit of useless info to add to all the other useless stuff clouding this old brain.
Cheers,
Steve.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 08 June, 2019, 06:09:41 pm
Picked up these
Soft wire cutter
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 08 June, 2019, 06:11:10 pm
ADJUST-A-BOX
Never seen one
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 09 June, 2019, 09:56:51 pm
Hi

How would you like to be hanging on to this baby, 1 inch square drive torque driver.  I believe it came from the APPM paper mill in Burnie Tas.

Regards

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 14 June, 2019, 05:37:27 am
Hello all
Here's a 'what is it?'. It's some sort of grinder similar to a sickle bar sharpener. Does anyone know for what particular purpose? It pivots up and down as well as side to side (by means of handle hidden behind winding handle in the second picture) and can be clamped to something. I thought a cylinder mower grinder.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/S_xOxsHdIIqrDMiMejCStORl3Zo3tyENeMH6sGxi276C24Lkw0tJKfhf4A_wseigVbiil_Qjs24Wwh8ulSTo7kYR2VYBEdokJ1ox19laXYctif93EQJ3Q0r7x6zlyzBmONIVllB780m8jMV_x_F-QnGFVBOGFbheL5SrEwI6yKNi4FfvMKHxy3TWr5LbqIDvyLCdcsB-CqU8_g3_e9YRegmQvok46iXKNgxDKkj9Kb9W7PdM77PDrjWSOzMO0BQAyAa7BaRTUVT0xi_cpla-loIiQvFE4TYECp5b_T1rnJNl48zGK2IApnG6reglTMcK6eWepES_uex8cvl1W6OeXwxVNx5B9dxEYuaVAbw65v749-lRQ7VY6MzRL3cfyjJrB1UjOie1xmVPBkz1QYN_VKKnmx_zjVAwwC2BK5cKevtZ9oZhKxWcl4CHJMCK5N9GP-oosM1CzICb4ppOXAAiiLtbKn2tMO2-XO1W7EPAXY-la5Hf9ijN9F_pu2hluQsZN6oPZP_GK3n-u3MUj6MEQRgvJVfiPMnd4QD7CGMSRdTvJcciC8pzJZQoRxe5fhE5dg9Q8SJNGUUWJdglW98_NVy9R8nSVJc6YLz_ugIocdFF6dIQcrMLdqSYtB1z9VCFZoDCMDmeWMB8XHros6L55TGaK0pNLnCRxhw4LZZXaleVEuXnAh30dTVnTWUDrZomoawA6ULyQc4NH2vAIBk3zcdQBQ=w937-h625-no)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/FWKiodU18Jkl2K_bU_qpD0iYvs-nyQK62XgwR71y9uwpbgRaTWVhDXfhRJnmD-eQaC2Ddm9iNzOkQcg_AItMIj-b-Y7vaWpDvLoXwhSdd_9HFdK_H-O3y0MNbo1_QBHCOWlWcAp4b4bcirEH4x2sMTwWbriawQjaq5pXIglrmi2rM_k22Zve_bi5x6BeE74h67R4Z1zV1gJI_DqLLWp_gR5VLn6ken6oA38G_S7PkQtehAsO-FPWO2RypVFPG9LpN9uXRtUDFYp43hau8HcFmHfCh9JTQnQcJ-lEPHo2lIZq7XYydVUgxqgTJ3LinwIA2S05BCpqmgAFmOKdsSuKyFY8JEeyHs_1LIBtPR02pZV4qeoKWDm4j7S4ULR4xHfDLPitJd7VmRoXQBJtnfItZ3LbV57FtDivkwJRxg6DicaqTlas9UzJOOxb75riV4WHG2LaIblI_F8JElM3HJfhm6S9RPyMLJLBBOW5XzptgLOUObQK15KQP5iRROMLOe3lLAbif5VtLih19JDsdAiHkRs27-cD8P7JI2nTbTCNxMNIJ4df8-5YMdVyxrjWy8p9sLlq9dqr5DEGCZltsoVpxmfZnT5D2xMjVXXRzga_-mkjdUm9mC464OAU6s-NgjERSlSIEtqRVkevDtUmyFVBDu9_b47JVsKd=w238-h357-no)

And here's a simple one.
Cheers Scott

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/EGX1rXj63wxYiPHwgokN_gFOQ-h-KwbxEL9GrlvRQbJW-YcTwqYDXDSKLj8JesvgdKSxzeOS1HX5V1A8hmlyIZjxo1PL0Djerd7P1jpoMl525dPpsc6Uq-46qY2XB2dr7y7_n2_XjICSjMjyUkB4F_m-kikMWVejVf1NXE1aaIG2b336n-cWUglaIVoMij4-yZqDg4xZMXvX6WxBBmwZvmnNdeW4uHIx3wLJHuq9kJg5gtU6549dCjJ19e7AikrktAud6uiJLITegy4O9ywhpW_XuTnAaRem6VqkUITWh8gQbg2Ls3yzHI2TLwUtoPe00BkSwyyZT-5lH0W9auV_moAuXCN1WTvdIErAi2EvrFCQ05qJJfg6k4-y_6m9wiO97_gJxJGNV_Rinh3C0TfVOCwLOXqrWq5DfQT5HPVx2y52w7T3YLqQZm1HAh_R3tGFkwyiFuPPZn3lBqONIhtXLydbUrpzA0qWWPEP6LnoZ75egnuz5hU-gGd-iqfGThd0izF3LygWBkKYu_osDyntAM8qzveZ8VUSvT-vvkKxIFqDgPk64lYEM7ZyDBu36nIt815GlySSv4Rk1NHUgXITALSjC0uwYePQcKRETb0Zn2qtwE3rer5uDdC_6kNnBiepfBwkVCZnOdeU0qFDX4Y0cUdXd_L-LQeIt1QdA7f6EjTtznAZGsWmT6UvWIQLKDiQU9onvJQ9B2d2F9wxToicBOytqg=w939-h625-no)
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 14 June, 2019, 02:45:58 pm
For the grinder to be for sharpening a cylinder mower it would have to be able to travel left to right the width of the cylinder. The sign behind it says "hand linisher" would that help?    :P
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 15 June, 2019, 06:46:28 am
For the grinder to be for sharpening a cylinder mower it would have to be able to travel left to right the width of the cylinder. The sign behind it says "hand linisher" would that help?    :P
That was a rough guess after someone said something. Most of the people there are not convinced. I'll get some better pictures next week.

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 15 June, 2019, 03:59:48 pm
Get that new you beaut camera out fella and count all the pixels.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 01 July, 2019, 02:53:54 pm
Picked up this 48 page book

Tools List
1st September 1938
Ironmongeries Pty. Ltd
152 Queen St
Btisbane
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 04 July, 2019, 07:47:32 am
Hello Ian
One item I really took note of is the term turnscrew instead of screwdriver. Even then us sparky dudes had to be special and have their own sort of turnscrew.  ;D

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 04 July, 2019, 04:48:33 pm
Well so did fettlers on the railway. Their shovels became semi-automatic ballast levelers.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 14 July, 2019, 05:41:58 pm
Helped a friend who is 82 clean up around his shed and found these (pictures) he said gee, so that is where they got lost them a few odd years ago
He said that they were his fathers and must be at least 100 years old
Cleaned them and gave them back
Oh was he surprised I thought he was going to cry
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: klanger on 14 July, 2019, 06:05:58 pm
Good on ya Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 15 July, 2019, 03:40:19 pm
Nice one Ian.

You dont want to buy them engines off PuttPutt do you?
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 15 July, 2019, 04:54:33 pm
I did not know he any for sale, have not heard from him go long time
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 16 July, 2019, 03:59:31 pm
He popped up again under yet another name on Smokstak and pretending that he was going to buy some crappy engines not running for big money and wanted some ideas about what they are worth.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 August, 2019, 01:27:59 pm
$5 grange sale pick up some odd ones there
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 13 August, 2019, 04:28:18 pm
Nice find Ian.

If you buy a bottle of Grange for $5.00 I will double your money if you like!
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 13 August, 2019, 05:35:53 pm
Yes did from ph to many big fingers and bloody spell check where mine auto replace the word with what it (phone) thinks you are trying to spell grrrrrr I with there was at least say 5 minutes to edit
GARAGE
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 14 August, 2019, 04:41:25 pm
Sounds like you got "PUTT PUTT" inside your phone.

Go to your settings and switch off predictive text and your worries will be no longer. Sometimes speel check can do some funny things too.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 August, 2019, 05:41:11 pm
I thought these were a set until cleaned
3 manufacturers names
Auto-Kit, USA
Matador, Germany
Indestro USA
Ian
 
 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 August, 2019, 05:45:32 pm
What was this spanner used for?
Why? look at the size of the head to the slot for nut/bolt
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 18 August, 2019, 09:31:22 pm
Many years ago my Dad had a foot operated 3' gilloutine and the spanners that came with it looked very similar in design to those ones but these were  large sizes around 7/8"W so big enough.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 20 August, 2019, 07:43:19 pm
Going by this a good find
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Vintage-GREGORY-STEEL-Gregsteel-9-16-1-2-SAE-SPANNER-Old-Wrench-Hand-Tool-191-/202327706031?_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l4275.c10
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 27 August, 2019, 10:53:41 am
This spanner is the type you get when something you bought has to be assembled
But for what ?? as what got me interested why the cut out etc
Ian
 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 27 August, 2019, 09:47:36 pm
Interesting spanner, no idea for that notch out.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 28 August, 2019, 12:09:38 pm
Dual purpose? Used one way up for hex nuts and upside down for C spanner nuts. Still does not explain the kink in the hex on both ends though.

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 08 September, 2019, 12:17:23 pm
Hi
Any ideas what this was used for.

Cheers

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 09 September, 2019, 05:00:45 pm
I don't know if I want to see how it was used it looks 'dangerous'  ;D
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 09 September, 2019, 07:11:33 pm
Hi Ian

One bloke at our weekend rally, thought it was for closing wool packs, eg. Pulling the flaps tight before putting the staple in

Cheers

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 09 September, 2019, 07:13:36 pm


Reminds me a bit of the things used to grab and carry block ice, back in the day when we had ice chests rather than fridges.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 10 September, 2019, 08:36:16 am
Hi  wee-allis

If it was for picking something up both sets of prong would be facing inward?

Cheers

Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 10 September, 2019, 07:09:16 pm

Got you Ian, but with it folded like it is in the photo, it's a bit hard to see how it operates.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: cobbadog on 11 September, 2019, 04:59:55 pm
I think it is a barbed wire  strainer for putting tension on the wire when erecting. I have something similar but not the hooks you have rather it has a "U" shape for the wire to fit into.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Ian on 11 September, 2019, 07:46:34 pm
Hi

The tool is not mine, that's the only picture I have.  I will see the owner in the next few days (once I get over this head cold) and will get some more pics with it open.

Cheers Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Scott on 12 September, 2019, 05:50:26 pm
Hello Ian
To close wool bails I reckon

Cheers Scott
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 17 September, 2019, 12:28:20 pm
A different use for old tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 September, 2019, 10:48:47 am
Picked up some more tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 23 September, 2019, 10:50:23 am
The ring spanner *Grey Toronto Canada* is interesting as it is bent on one end have not seen that before and it was never bent BUT what size? one end 3/4 the other 2324 what size is that
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 23 September, 2019, 11:45:20 am
Is the straight/bent ring spanner 3/4 both ends? If so the 2324 is probably the manufacturer's part number.

What is the little clamp between the two Five Minute Vulcaniser clamps for? A few years ago I bought some vulcaniser patches to repair a tube from the 27 Chev. I was surprised to find they were still available. These were made in China. No matter what I tried I could not get the heating compound to ignite. I even tried soaking one in methylated spirits: the metho just burned off, leaving the heating tablet unmarked. Tried using a pin point flame from a propane torch: it produced a small charred circle, but the heating compound still would not burn - had to take the tube to a tyre service to get it repaired.

I wonder if they were a new product - safety patches - guaranteed not to burn careless users?

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Cockie on 23 September, 2019, 11:50:51 am
Have used the Footprint wrench, and the vulcanising clamps. I had problems back in 1974 when I took a job with BHP at Port Headland, they issued me a tool list and among the items was a Mole Wrench. Went to every tool shop in Sydney and got some very funny remarks, but no wrench or wench. It turned out to be vice grips, and it was a colloquial, name as Mole was a manufacturer same as Crescent Wrench. 
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: David Syme on 23 September, 2019, 12:59:06 pm
The clamp between the two vulcanising ones could be used at the top of the windscreen post of a tourer car. Photo of 1929 Nash.
David.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 23 September, 2019, 05:39:03 pm
The clamp between the two vulcanising ones could be used at the top of the windscreen post of a tourer car. David.

Not really. It is a mounting clamp for an Acme clothes wringer.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 September, 2019, 09:20:04 am
Hi Eric yes "Acme" how was it used, can be mounted 2 ways 
Looks some changes to the jaws
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 September, 2019, 09:22:16 am
How old would this be,
made in Sydney? by who
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 24 September, 2019, 09:24:11 am
Hi Ian
Yes the spanner is the same size both ends so could be a part number
Why have the same size both ends
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: franco on 24 September, 2019, 07:03:43 pm
Special tool to access to a particularly difficult-to-access bolt or nut on a vehicle or specific piece of machinery?

Frank.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Eric Schulz on 24 September, 2019, 07:29:34 pm
Apparently not all wringers were mounted on a dividing wall or partition in a laundry trough, so they had a more flexible mounting. The attached photo gives you the general idea of how that happened.

Eric
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 25 September, 2019, 05:33:51 pm
Found this dated 1936
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: wee-allis on 25 September, 2019, 07:08:29 pm

Quality tools were expensive even back then. But you do get what you pay from. I'm still using some I've had since the '60s and even my old dad's Sidchrome 18" shifter from the '40s.
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 October, 2019, 05:50:15 pm
Yeah got some more tools
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 October, 2019, 05:51:09 pm
One of the spanners is a bike spanner? it is cast iron so that puts it a few years old but what got me is on one side "Made in England" turn over and there is "Austral" doers that mean anything to anybody
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 October, 2019, 05:51:49 pm
One of the spanners is a bike spanner? it is cast iron so that puts it a few years old but what got me is on one side "Made in England" turn over and there is "Austral" doers that mean anything to anybody
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 October, 2019, 05:52:55 pm
Anybody seen one of these
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: rustyengines on 18 October, 2019, 10:47:25 pm
Took a while found what it is called "Slip Lock Speed Wrench" year 1920-30s
OR
"7 inch Sliding Wedge Style Quick Adjust "
Ian
Title: Re: Tool 1
Post by: Cockie on 19 October, 2019, 07:34:32 am
Rustybits,
Have a look at the third spanner on this web site. https://www.htpaa.org.au/hand-tools/australian-tools-makers/australian-wrenches/agricultural-wrenches

Dave T