Author Topic: Tool 1  (Read 54590 times)

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #150 on: 07 October, 2016, 09:53:37 am »
Hi Steve don't know it was here
http://www.historicvillageherberton.com.au/
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

wee-allis

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #151 on: 07 October, 2016, 07:11:10 pm »

 Sorry mate, but knowing how good and varied your collection is, I thought you were holding out on us.
Cheers, Steve.
If it's old, treat it like gold.
C1300 Inter, 38 Allis B,47 VAK1A David Brown,48 TEA Fergie, 53 Morris Six,  Moruya, Sth coast NSW.

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #152 on: 11 October, 2016, 02:17:44 pm »
Another saw
Going by the shape and the locking bit 1950s ??
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #153 on: 11 October, 2016, 02:22:30 pm »
How would this clamp be used or was it part of something else
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #154 on: 11 October, 2016, 06:15:34 pm »
Hello Ian
I'd guess a bit earlier for your saw. Saws similar to that started getting alloy handles in the 50's I thought. But I'm more then likely wrong.

Are you bringing some of your tools to Oakey Ian?

Cheers Scott

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #155 on: 27 October, 2016, 10:20:25 pm »
Interesting pliers double ended
These are owned by Scott
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

tanksmate

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #156 on: 27 October, 2016, 11:53:28 pm »
tHAT sure is an interesting pair of plier.s  luv em.  Cheers John

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #157 on: 01 November, 2016, 06:37:25 pm »
Some people just have to much time on their hands
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #158 on: 01 November, 2016, 07:28:02 pm »
How would this clamp be used or was it part of something else
Ian
Hello Ian
I have a funny feeling that clamp is for holding down sickle mower sections for sharpening.

Cheers Scott

allisb

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #159 on: 01 November, 2016, 07:52:23 pm »
Thought I'd try to join in on this topic.
Something different?
I spend most of my pay on old tractors and engines, I tend to waste the rest

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #160 on: 02 November, 2016, 09:14:40 am »
Hello Rex
Mate, is that a brake drum measurererer?

Cheers Scott

allisb

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #161 on: 02 November, 2016, 10:03:22 am »
Gidday, no. It's just a general measuring tool, I think from the 50's. (presumed you would have one  ;)   )
Pretty cute eh? The second pic may give you a better idea of the size, has some graduations.

Cheers

I spend most of my pay on old tractors and engines, I tend to waste the rest

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #162 on: 18 November, 2016, 09:53:38 am »
Hello all
Rex, yep. Very cute and probably very useful.

Here is something I picked up this week. I reckon everyone on this forum would be able to use it.
A KLG Plug Service Centre from the mid 60's it seems. It cleans the plug and tests it under compression.
The bloody thing wasn't working on Wednesday but a 1/2 day on it solved the main problem of the spark making dodad not making sparks.
What was the reason for no sparks I hear you say. Cobba is going to love this.....the 12v Oak vibrator unit was broke. So I pulled the Oak vibrator apart (not as easy as it sounds as it was sealed) and gave it a good going over. A capacitor was also blown which is probably why the vibrator broke. So now a brilliant spark.
A complete rewire also happened as the old rubber insulated cables were....well buggered.

Once the plug is clean, you put it in the testing side and there's a little mirror at the bottom that you can adjust to see the bottom of the plug. One the scale there is a scale for pressure and spark plug gap. The knob on the front of the scale is to adjust plug gap. The lever towards the front adjusts air pressure which mimics combustion chamber pressure. You dial up the pressure until you see the spark doing something it's not supposed to. You then look at the red needle and reference it to the plug gap scale.
Anyways, it's working well now so it's sitting on a shelf in the house. I wonder how long it'll take until it's noticed and other sorts of sparks start to fly?  Probably lucky I'm going away for a week tomorrow ;D

Oh, it has a few adaptors to screw plugs into the testing side as well.
Something else I noticed. When your using the spark making dodad it knocks out the wireless. The wireless looses all reception and doesn't come back on when the sparks haves stopped. And then the wireless comes back on when you make some more sparks. I don't know why but I hope not many people near me were wanting to listen to John Laws yesterday. They might have been quite upset at me.

Cheers Scott








franco

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #163 on: 18 November, 2016, 11:46:12 am »
Scott,

For a couple of years in the late forties, probably 1948 and 1949, I worked at an ancient garage in Oxford Street Sydney during my school holidays.  About the only "modern" piece of equipment was an earlier version of your plug service centre. I don't remember an abrasive cleaning ability - if it was there it was not working. It had separate holes for 10mm, 14 mm, 18mm, 7/8" and 1/2" NPT plugs.

Even in 1948 a lot of automotive parts were still in short supply or very expensive in the aftermath of WW2. The owner was a bit of a bower bird, and would never throw anything away if it could have any possible conceivable future use. Among other items he had accumulated were several buckets full of used spark plugs.

One of my first jobs was to clean these using a broken hacksaw blade with a taper ground to match the taper of the plug's insulator, blow them out, check the gap, and test them. They were then sorted into those that failed under 60 psi which were rejected, those that failed between 60 and 80 psi, those that failed between 80 and 100 psi, and 100psi or better. These were then sold for, I think sixpence for the low testing ones, then a shilling for the next bracket, then one shillings and sixpence for the "good" ones. There was no lack of buyers!

I had an aircraft plug someone had given me. On the tester it was still sparking happily at 150 psi, the shop compressor setting.

Since he was only paying me a pound ($2) a week it was probably a profitable exercise. Most of my schoolmates used to go to the big department stores wrapping Christmas parcels for about seven pounds a week, so I was making no fortune - I think I learned a lot more than they did though.

Frank.
Cairns, Queensland

allisb

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #164 on: 18 November, 2016, 06:13:29 pm »
Yip, remember using one during my apprenticeship. You could load up the air pressure and see how they performed.
Isn't it amazing how long spark plugs last nowadays? Pay more for them, but they certainly last longer. I suppose that's one advance in the auto field. I don't like some of the advances, but I do like the comfort of quiet powerful diesels in comfortable air conditioning and not using much fuel along the way. I miss the old cars, but not all of their "features"
Rx
I spend most of my pay on old tractors and engines, I tend to waste the rest