Author Topic: Tool 1  (Read 54618 times)

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #165 on: 18 November, 2016, 06:57:16 pm »
I miss the old cars, but not all of their "features"
Rx
Hello Rex,
Mate, you need a Kingswood. Old school charm with most of the conveniences like air con, power steering, cruise, central locking and all that caper.
When I first met my beloved, she was up me for driving an old car. She had just brought herself a new E36 318 iS Mtech and thought it was the best thing since slice bread. Then she drove The Kingswood. The beemer was still the best thing since sliced bread but she really enjoyed driving The Kingswood. Sad thing was she could go through a tank of fuel in about 30kms. She loves that carbi sucking fuel noise and the dual exhausts out of the V8  :-\

Cheer Scott

allisb

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #166 on: 18 November, 2016, 08:02:54 pm »
Too right. Could live with that. Love the old V8s, but couldn't afford to run one nowadays! Had a lovely V8 Falcon Wagon for a few years. 4 barrel holly, twin pipes. Ahhh, yesssss. Memories!
But I digress
Rx
I spend most of my pay on old tractors and engines, I tend to waste the rest

cobbadog

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #167 on: 19 November, 2016, 01:49:41 pm »
Convert them to having fuel injection, should be simple enough to do from a wrecked late model V8.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

David Syme

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #168 on: 04 December, 2016, 01:23:59 pm »
 Same style as a blacksmiths leg vice, well made and had some use, no name. May be for light metalworking. Needed a T bar and clamp washer.
David.

cobbadog

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #169 on: 05 December, 2016, 02:53:38 pm »
Have seen blokes who make models use these.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #170 on: 06 February, 2017, 02:34:31 pm »
Hello all
It's been awhile since anyone has posted tools so here goes.
The first is a shifter I brought at the Allora Rally. I thought it would be a useless bit of kit when I found it in a box of rubbish, but worth buying for nothing other then been unusual. But how was I wrong. It's actually really good to use. I thought the adjustment would simply slide out of place and rounded nuts and bolts would be the result. But a double gear drive to the adjuster lets the shifter to be super firm in the slider. Unbelievable, but true. Even the adjusting slider has less play in it then a brand new Sidchrome hanging on the wall. It's in the every day use tool box now




Then we have a wonky looking screwdriver. Anyone younger then 70 know what it's for?


Then we have the old "Trusty" screwdriver. It's quite nice to use as well


Now we have a tool that still gives me nightmares. I don't know if what we used it for was the right use of the tool but my dad had me using a similar tool to punch holes in sheets of roofing iron to put roofing nails into. I was only about 10 or 11 to start and spent days on roofs with a string line, one of these and a hammer. Why does new iron have to go up in Summer?


That'll do for now.
Cheers Scott

tractorfan

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #171 on: 06 February, 2017, 05:07:20 pm »
That second screwdriver, I think has the attachment to hold the screw on the end of the blade. It's only a guess as I haven't seen one like that, but I'm sure I've seen modern screwdrivers with a similar style of attachment.

cobbadog

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #172 on: 06 February, 2017, 05:16:22 pm »
I'm with you on that tractorfan. With the last item I had to buy a new version of that when I started panel beating. It was to be used for aligning holes when mounting body panels. Still have it and I use it a lot but not for the use that Scotty mentioned, banging holes in roofing iron. I'm glad they have self drilling roofing screws now.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #173 on: 07 February, 2017, 09:54:01 am »
Hello all
Yep, first screwdriver can hold a screw so you can put into places you couldn't normally reach. A magnetic tip screwdriver solves that problem real quick now-a-days. There's a few versions of that screw holder screwdriver laying about the shop here. A lot of work went into them to get a screw to stay put on the end.

Cobba. I never thought about that for the pointy tool. Aligning holes.
If you look at the non pointy end of this tool you'll noticed it's mushroomed a lot. Either panels fitted very badly and needed a lot of persuasion or somebody saw me a s a kid. Either way, I'll use it the same way you did. Aligning stuff.

Here's a couple of pairs of pliers.
The first is A Wilkinson Tool from merry old England which was made in 1959. About 10" in length with a funny set of jaws. Anyone know why the funny jaws? I wonder if they were for wire beading when working with tin?
The second is a 7" pair made by E.A. Berg of Sweden. Nice pliers to use. They might go into the everyday box as well. The wire cutter on the side is a nice feature.

And then we have mystery set of cutters. Made of stainless with no brand name. They have a badly closing set of jaws on them. Only the tip will cut. Not even any good in the boat with the jaws the way they are. Anyone know their intended use? To me, they look medical or dental.

Cheers Scott
 





Oldengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #174 on: 07 February, 2017, 11:57:14 am »
we used same cutters for finger/toe nail cutters when growing up, dad still uses them.
Cheers from West Aussie.

cobbadog

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #175 on: 07 February, 2017, 04:40:32 pm »
Hi Scotty, both sets of pliers have 'wire cutters' and both have side cutters as well. The side cutters are obvious but the wire cutters are the small notches at the back of the jaws, open the pliers, place in the wire and close the pliers.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Scott

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #176 on: 07 February, 2017, 04:47:46 pm »
we used same cutters for finger/toe nail cutters when growing up, dad still uses them.
Hello all
It's hard to see in the picture but these cutters are flat like side cutters. Our toenail cutters are curved. Are your dad's flat or curved?
We broke a set of the curved blade toenail cutters cutting dad's toenails once. My Dad's toenails are like saw blades to cut. All us kids hated that job.  :P

Yep, sure noticed the cutters on both sets of pliers Cobba. The ones on the Wilkinsons are quite worn and battered. The ones on the Berg's are rather nice. I'll have to hide the Bergs from Mrs Scotty so she doesn't pinch them for girlie fencing pliers. She has a habit of losing tools in the paddock.
Cheers Scott

tanksmate

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Re: pointed spike Tool
« Reply #177 on: 12 February, 2017, 11:54:52 am »
Hi Scott,  that pointed spike tool that your dad used to punch holes into roofing iron is correct.  I used one exactly the same ( and still have it) and used it in the late 50"s when I was an apprentice plumber. Roofing Iron or corrugated iron used to be soft and then it started to be made hard or hi tensile. A roofing nail would just slide off the top of the corrugations and take a chunk of the finger with it. A very pointy spike was needed to start the hole. I dont know how many times I took a gouge of flesh off the side of a finger trying to hold a nail and start it off to hammer it in.  Very glad I dont do any work like that today.   cheers.  John
ps, these days I use that spike for lining up machinery onto holes for bolts to go in.

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #178 on: 13 February, 2017, 10:39:34 am »
Pick up another odd one plus a ruler
Made of Alloy very short I would say come of some piece of machinery for a one type of use 
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE

rustyengines

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Re: Tool 1
« Reply #179 on: 13 February, 2017, 11:10:18 am »
The ruler that came with the above spanner
Made by J. Rabone UK number 1397 made from "Box Wood" what is box wood eg type of tree etc 
The best date I can get it was made before 1962 as that is when the company changed names
Ian
Southern Cross Engines, Lawn Mowers and old tools * TOWNSVILLE