Author Topic: Make my own  (Read 2135 times)

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #30 on: 16 March, 2020, 06:28:27 am »
Cobba  your welding looks pretty good to me. If my welds aren't quite upto it I use an angle grinder heavy disc to take off the rough spots. I have a new 3 in 1 welder. The stick welder is computer controlled and certainly does a nicer weld than my old 1974 model stick. But I have never used the MIG bit as I have never had any luck with migs in the past. I must try it one day just never seem to have the time. As for the TIG capability it never came with the gun and it is quite expensive. Maybe one day. But I do need to master the MIG as I have a few car body projects and migs are the best even though years ago all body work was done with oxy. I do have an oxy but bronzing thin sheet is a definate way to produce buckles that the old body men used to shrink out. Tried that to but never mastered the tecnique.

cobbadog

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #31 on: 16 March, 2020, 09:52:20 pm »
Hi Rob,
WELDERS can be a mystery to those who cannot weld but like many things practise and then more practise. I've been practising for years and to me it is still a hit n miss affair. My big issue is being able to see what I am doing. My arc welding helmet was too dark as my looker glasses also darken in bright light so I bought another lense which is the lightest to help see things. Still having issues I bought a new set of reading glasses that are clear and this helped a lot.
One day I went even madder than normal and researched and bought a MIG online. It too can be an arc, TIG and MIG welder and in the bginning I bought the gasless wire to use as the rental on bottles was too rude.
With minimum success using gasless wire I found out by accident I could get my gas at Bunnings, only a small bottle but I'm not making a living out of it and this was around $100.00 as a one off cost then simply swap the bottle over for refills and that last time was around $90.00. Bought the standard wire and changed the polarity over to run on gas and this helped me out a lot and sometimes I get good results and other times as in the pics not so good. Something I did before jumping in the deep end was watch a heap of YouTube clips and look for the tips and hints they offer. Also I get positive feedback as to what I have done wrong by qualified forum members who really know their stuff and I take that onboard as a positive thing as I certainly am not good enough, yet.
As for TIG, I used to be a very good oxy welder when I was doing an apprenticeship as a panel beater. I dont have the TIG attachements either and possibly wont as the MIG with 0.8mm wire can weld down to some fairly light metals whic I wont find on a tractor and recently did a heap of rust repairs on Loryy the truck which is up for rego inspection this Friday and is all pretty and ready to go. I can only suggest that you too look at some video clips and see what can done and how much quicker it is than using arc. My arc welder was nicknamed "the battery charger" as it is not much bigger than one and is almost as light but bou can it put out some juice. IT is an inverter welder and it is a pleasure to use and had it in action on the box trailer recently.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #32 on: 17 March, 2020, 03:00:23 pm »
Best of luck with the rego. I guess the roadworthy is the problem. The rego is usually just bureaucratic stuff these days.

My problem with welding these days is both being able to see and trying to stop my hand from shaking. I bought a new mid priced helmet and it is much better than my old one, it is fitted with an optional magnifying lense. As are my oxy goggles. I do have to say I don't have much time left on earth and so need to do stuff as quick as I can and neatness is for those with more years left than I have. I have a mate building a whole 1930's car from almost scratch and he will redo and redo every little thing until it is almost perfect. I don't have the paitience. He has probably made at least 3 and some times more of every panel. The dash board is very complicated shape and he has made at least three and says he is still not happy with it. They look fine to me.

A welder applied for  job advertised with wage from $15 to $30 per hour. He had to submit two sample welds. One was cocky poo, and one perfect. The prospective employer said "why is one so bad?" The welder said "the cocky poo is $15 an hour the perfect weld is $30 per hour take your pick". ;D

cobbadog

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #33 on: 17 March, 2020, 04:44:48 pm »
Like the elder joke, you get what you pay for!
As for the rego on Lorry, he is in very good nick for a 1991 model FC144. Only thing I expect as it came up last year is the faded number plate. He went away and said he had to read the rule so he exactly understood what it meant. He said he would pass it that time but asked that I replaced the plates but this would mean loosing my original plates and have to go to national truck plates and I don't like that idea. So I have swapped them arse about face for the moment to see what happens. He claims that you must be able to read the plates clearly at a certain distance, and I said that you can. It is just that the cheap paint that the NSW Government put on the plates has faded but you can clearly read them.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #34 on: 18 March, 2020, 07:05:55 am »
In QLD you can get your existing plate redone in black and white in the old style even if it was originally one of the later colours. Cost $165 but becomes a personnel plate and is yours for ever. Can swap to other vehicles, with the necessary paper work of course. It is even allowed to be fitted to historic registered vehicles which normally have plates starting with "S" . Trouble is you have to have it on full registration when you do it. So if changing from full registration to club registration you need to do it before they issue your "S" numbered plate. We only have a few weeks left with the existing 3 letters 3 numbers as of old and then we are going to another style altogether as the three letters are now into the "z" range. I was going to put one of my club reg cars on full registration just so as to get a black and white old style plate. But found that it was cheaper to get a three letter three numbers of my choice (if not already taken) as a personnel plate ($450 ish) to fit to a club registered car. Sorry if that sounds complicated but its not really.

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #35 on: 18 March, 2020, 07:09:00 am »
Seeing this thread is about make your own, a clever panel man could make a new plate. Perhaps not legal but done properly not likely to be obvious. Ours are in aluminium so easy to work.

cobbadog

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #36 on: 18 March, 2020, 04:53:02 pm »
Plates are in perfect shape but the yellow has faded and that is what the issue is. I really peeves me that the plates are not mine just on my truck, they are owned by NSW Government and they have control over what paint and colours went onto the plate. Since they chose to use cheap crap paint it should be their responsibility to fix the problem but they wont. The only option is National Truck plates if I change them, no other style is allowed on this size truck not even personal ones.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #37 on: 18 March, 2020, 08:30:02 pm »
Match the colour and spray it, I would. Do a good job and no one will even notice who looks closely enough at number plates to see it has been re sprayed. The worst that can happen is make you get a new plate anyhow. How big is this truck?

cobbadog

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #38 on: 18 March, 2020, 10:07:25 pm »
I have thought of that but getting the reflective look as well is a bit tricky. I am just going to front up with them as they are and see how we get on. After all I did weld up and paint the massive rust holes at the bottom of the "A" pillar that he brought to my attention, as if I didn't already know about that.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #39 on: 23 June, 2020, 05:53:42 am »
Well Cobbadog did you get the truck registered? I am still working on the milling machine. Countless number of hours as I discover what I thought would work doesn't. Still at it though. Every thing is mounted including power switch etc. But I need to turn a shaft from the gear box to fit a pulley. I did this based on the size of the hole at the top of the stacked pulley only to find the hole was actually tapered.   >:(    Luckily I have a taper that will fit so now I need to turn the shaft to fit this tapered item.  :-\

cobbadog

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Re: Make my own
« Reply #40 on: 23 June, 2020, 04:19:06 pm »
Hi Rob,
The usual guy that does rego inspections or health checks as I call them was on holidays so the next guy in line with the knowledge never bothered about the plates. Everything else got a thorough check just the way I like it as I dont want to have a problem when out on the highways. So Lorry passed his health check with no worries at all and is happily sitting in the yard waiting for a load or just to go for a drive which we do every now and then to keep the oils up and over the things it should and no leaks.
So Lorry keeps his original plates for yet another year.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.