Author Topic: Austin Tractor 1922  (Read 4322 times)

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #45 on: 24 June, 2020, 01:45:33 pm »
Having ordered 42 metres of 3/8 straight copper tube at $31.50 per metre I was informed that the quote was wrong and it was double that. So I have contacted the site in UK posted by Franco. But I think soft copper rolls will do the job just need to make a device to straighten coiled copper. I am sure the cost of the pommie stuff will be more frightening than the straight pipe.

cobbadog

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3376
  • Buzacott Farm Pumper.
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #46 on: 24 June, 2020, 04:01:16 pm »
Maybe running the flexible tube between 3 rollers might bring it back to shape but would be better with a small groove in the rollers to keep it inline.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

famous fitter

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 152
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #47 on: 24 June, 2020, 04:08:44 pm »
Hi Rob,

Maybe ask a plumber to buy the Tube wholesale on your behalf ,they may get the tube at a trade or wholesale price that the company cannot give direct to a non account holder. If I go into the local electrical wholesaler outlet the price is retail , if I get my sparky mate to buy it on his account it?s a fair whack cheaper.

It would be better to use hard drawn tube than coil but ya gotta do what ya gotta do !!

Cheers Justin

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #48 on: 25 June, 2020, 06:09:49 am »
Cabadog I think the best would be 5 rollers with a 3/8 groove. I think cheap rope pulleys from ships chandeler would work. Soft copper is $91 for a 18 m roll. Hard straight copper is for refridgeration. Even with trade discount still expensive. Waiting for a reply from the radiator place in UK. Ain't restoration slow.

cobbadog

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3376
  • Buzacott Farm Pumper.
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #49 on: 25 June, 2020, 04:01:14 pm »
The more the better for the rollers, the less the better for the copper. Yes, restoration work is and can be fun and is why we do it, to challenge ourselves.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #50 on: 25 June, 2020, 07:42:09 pm »
Exactly. The challenge that keeps you thinking as we get older and older and even older.

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #51 on: 09 July, 2020, 04:01:49 pm »
The copper radiator pipes have the remains of steel "gills" as they are called. I call them washers but anyway I was looking at acids that will remove the rusty steel but leave the copper untouched. I understand that phosphoric acid does remove the steel but not the copper. If that was the case then I could reuse the copper pipes. I think I'll try one and see. I'll block the tube to limit any internal damage. I am not all that hopeful. At the moment there is a delay as I wait to get stitches out of my back after a melonoma was removed. Another old mate at the museum is restoring a Self Propelled header. A Massey 585. But he has been stuck on the engine for months. Freeing rusted in valves and now two pistons that are rusted in place. He turned up a round block of wood to fit the bore and has been alternatively soaking in various liquids and belting the wood with a sledge hammer. Some success, they have moved and believe it or not the bore is fine. The pistons are ???able though. The other job I have tackled is setting up an old lathe. It is over 60 years since I did any lathe work or training but the internet bought a lot back. It is in fine shape really except for a belled chuck. I'll build a tool post grinder to take 8 thou out of the back of the jaws. We are also looking at restoring several very old ceiling fans to mount above our workshop area. We have an old electrician that will do the electrical stuff. So far we haven't been able to undo the main bolt holding the motor to the shaft. Currently the milling machine I am building is on the verge of being finished. I just took too much metal off a shaft for a gear box drive pulley and now I'll have to build it up with weld and turn it down again. Next comes a 100 year old pedestal drill. Variety is the spice of life.

cobbadog

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3376
  • Buzacott Farm Pumper.
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #52 on: 09 July, 2020, 09:31:38 pm »
You certainly have a bit on the go. I have used phosphoric acid a lot to clean up metal but not had it on copper. I know it is ok on brass if that helps. I bought a 1ltr bottle at Bunnings some time back and was not badly priced and they sell it in larger quantities but if memory serves me right the price appeared to have jumped up a lot. It was a Bondall product and was in the paint section.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #53 on: 10 July, 2020, 07:51:25 am »
Yes I have used it for rusty steel. I have a 40 litre bath of it. I get it from my local produce where it is sold as a Dairy Cleaner for milking machine pipe lines. Not cheap perhaps $60 for 20 litres. When I had the farm in a horticultural area the local co-op sold it as phosphric acid for cleaning calcium out of small irrigation pipes. My bath has lasted for quite a few years and gets fairly regular use. Eventually it forms a heavy crust inside the bath walls and bottom and needs to be replaced. I strain it off and keep the good stuff and buy a new container for the bath. This is only the second time in 10 years I have had to do it.

cobbadog

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3376
  • Buzacott Farm Pumper.
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #54 on: 10 July, 2020, 10:36:45 pm »
Thats not a bad price for the quantity.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.

Rob Templin

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #55 on: 30 August, 2020, 01:01:49 pm »
Well I finally spent some more time on the radiator. Removed about 10 tubes and put them in the phosphoric acid. What is left of the steel gills eventually disappear and the copper pipe is covered in solder so that has to be melted off. But I can reuse the original pipes. The radiator will be 5 mm shorter as the pipes are flared and have to be partly drilled. I have tried, a hole saw to cut washers (gills), not sucessful. A wad punch wouldn't cut through the copper very easily and as over 8000 are required I didn't think this was practical. Next I tried a punch in a hole with the hydraulic press. It worked but the edges of both the hole and the punch had a slight chamfer and this meant there was a ragged edge. I'll have to make a punch and hole with sharp edges and try that. It is amazing how time consuming just small advances take. My press was only a cheap one and had so much slop I needed to tighten it up as well as make a new heavier anvil for it as the original was bent removing the king pins from the axle. This has taken some time.

cobbadog

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3376
  • Buzacott Farm Pumper.
Re: Austin Tractor 1922
« Reply #56 on: 30 August, 2020, 02:27:05 pm »
Look at it this way, as you progress with the radiator you get to repair your press. With a punch set up Dad used to have one years ago and it is long gone now bu it had a squared off ends but had a slight chamfer from one side to the other to help breaking through the metal. This was being used on 22 gauge sheet metal.
Cheers, John & Dee. Coopernook. NSW.